Sunday, September 28, 1997
Enquirer coverage
140 COLOR PHOTOS AROUND THE TRISTATE


Flood of 1997
Commemorative section with day-by-day account

Sunday, September 28, 1997
DISASTER BEGETS COMMON THREAD
To preserve that sense of community, Ms. Trapp, a director at the Ebersole Community Center in California, is working to assemble two commemorative quilts, made up of 12-by-12-inch squares donated by city departments, businesses and individuals.
QUILT PROJECT

Monday, September 15, 1997
HIGH SCHOOL WALL HOLDS REMINDER OF FLOOD
Things are back to normal at Pendleton County High School, used as a shelter after the March flood. But a heart-shaped ceramic mosaic on the lobby wall is an emotional picture of the flood's devastation and the good works that followed.
FALMOUTH

Sunday, September 14, 1997
APPRECIATIVE TOWN FEEDS VOLUNTEERS REBUILDING IT
The Franklin group is just one of dozens still coming to Falmouth to help rebuild. And they are part of the hundreds being served by ladies from Turner Ridge Baptist Church and other Pendleton County groups in the basement of the Falmouth Baptist Church.
FALMOUTH

Monday, September 1, 1997
FALMOUTH WAITING GETS FRUSTRATING
City council members say they want to build enough housing to keep displaced residents within the city. But such plans take time. And for many, time is ticking.
FALMOUTH

Sunday, August 31, 1997
OUT OF DEEP WATER
The task of pulling out what was lost in "The Flood of '97" seemed incomprehensible for the 6,000 or so people whose lives were affected. Six months after, they marvel at what they've accomplished.
6 MONTHS AFTER THE FLOOD

NOW THEY PREFER THINGS HIGH AND DRY
Six months later, the used mobile home they bought for $500 in March probably wouldn't be recognized by its former owner.
NEW RICHMOND

COUPLE FOCUSING ON NEW LIFE TO COME
Mrs. Bass took a part-time job at a Butler video store. Mr. Bass worked as much overtime as he could at Kahn's meat packing plant in Claryville. They saved enough and took out loans to buy another home and four acres, this time high above the water.
BUTLER

Sunday, July 20, 1997
FLOOD OF VOLUNTEERS REMAIN IN FALMOUTH
As last week's 89 volunteers finished their stay and headed out of town, new arrivals settled in and prepared for the week ahead.
FALMOUTH

Sunday, June 15, 1997
REBUILDING IS CHANCE FOR IMPROVING
Falmouth leaders say the delay in passing the federal disaster relief bill is giving them more time to complete the herculean task of creating an accurate monetary picture of what the town needs. The "vision team" will send a preliminary plan, including cost figures, to Washington early this week.
FALMOUTH

Saturday, June 14, 1997
FLOODED TOWN DOES BUSINESS FROM CLERK'S BASEMENT
In the three months since flood waters rose to within two inches of the city building's ceiling, the hub of Silver Grove operations has been City Clerk Kay Wright's basement.
SILVER GROVE

Tuesday, June 10, 1997
HARDY REBUILD IN NEW RICHMOND
Three months after the Ohio River returned to its trough - down a steep hillside from Front Street - New Richmond is open for business. When the river crested March 5 at 64.7 feet, the worst flooding since 1964 left New Richmond soaked and stunned but not subdued. "New Richmond will be here.
NEW RICHMOND

Monday, June 9, 1997
DREAM WASHED AWAY, SO COUPLE MOVES ON
By deciding to leave Falmouth, Laurie and Patrick Bass are throwing away their dreams of starting a family in the community both grew up in, deserting what they thought would become their dream home. The Basses will chase new dreams on four acres in the Pendleton County country side, high above the flood plain.
FALMOUTH

Saturday, June 7, 1997
CITIES BEGIN MONEY, PAPER CHASE
It could take two years before Falmouth leaders purchase the worst-damaged homes destroyed in the March 1 flood, Mike Lynch, hazard mitigation officer for the state Division of Disaster and Emergency Services, said Friday. The city must first come up with its 13 percent of the total project cost
CITIES

Wednesday, May 28, 1997
ONLY WORST-OFF GET FEDERAL BUYOUT
Falmouth was awarded $2.5 million in federal emergency funds to buy out the 97 worst-damaged properties, but that is less than half the number of propoerties submitted in the application. For the 114 homeowners with less-damaged properties, a buyout is no longer an option.
FALMOUTH

Tuesday, May 27, 1997
FLOOD GROUP DIRECTS WORKERS TO REPAIRS
FALMOUTH - A big factor in the recovery from March's flood has been a group of volunteers called Pencare - a coalition of church and civic leaders that matches workers with residents needing to rebuild and repair. And they're still going strong.
FALMOUTH

RABBIT HASH LANDMARK STORE BACK IN BUSINESS
The Flood of '97 turned the store, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, into an island, and about 3 feet of water and mud seeped into the antique structure, said co-owner Alexis Scott. But neighbors and customers helped clean it up, and it reopened last weekend.
RABBIT HASH
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Monday, May 19, 1997
FALMOUTH FACES ITS FUTURE
FALMOUTH - Pendleton County leaders aren't going to just stand by and let the federal and state governments decide what the future holds. Instead a "Vision Team" hopes to decide the fate of this flood-ravaged community.
STORY

Saturday, May 17, 1997
BOATER DIES ON RIVER HE LOVED
When the Ohio River ravaged New Richmond in early March, John Shropshire lent his boat to the fire department to rescue residents trapped by the rising water. Friday, residents were trying to comprehend the cruel coincidence that claimed his life.
BOATER

Wednesday, May 14, 1997
REASSURING WORDS FOR CHILDREN
FALMOUTH - Lacy Wright didn't think hugs could travel by mail, but the fifth-grader felt the strength that comes from a warm squeeze on Tuesday. It came from Brandy Neal, a California student. "She felt sorry for me because we have experienced the flood," Lacy said after reading her letter.
LETTERS

FLOOD LEVEE PONDERED FOR 2 TOWNS
SILVER GROVE - Government leaders in Campbell County have agreed to explore the feasibility of a flood levee for the low-lying Ohio River towns of Silver Grove and Melbourne.
LEVEE

Tuesday, May 13, 1997
DEADLY DISEASE LINKED TO FLOODS
Health officials in southern Ohio and North Dakota have been put on notice that the severe flooding in their regions might lead to clusters of a deadly lung disease that made more than two dozen Cleveland-area infants ill.
DISEASE

Monday, May 12, 1997
STALL ON DISASTER RELIEF AT CAPITOL
At first glance, helping regions recover from natural disasters would appear to be an issue safe from controversy in Congress. Think again. As the cumulative price tag for the suffering nature has brought in the 1990s grows, questions mount about whether the money is being spent wisely
RELIEF

5 FLOOD HEROES HONORED
When floodwaters from the Licking River trapped hundreds of people in downtown Falmouth, Sheldon Lindsey and Joseph Reynolds did what they say anyone else would. They each grabbed their boats and a Kentucky state trooper, and they started making rescues - and risking their lives.
HEROES

AID STILL HEADING TO FALMOUTH
More than two months after Falmouth and other parts of Pendleton County were flooded, donations of supplies and cash continue to pour in.
DONATIONS

Sunday, May 11, 1997
FLOOD-FIGHTER FINALLY ABLE TO WALK TO ALTAR
FALMOUTH, Ky. - What God joined together at Saturday's standing-room-only wedding of Julie Robinson and Assistant Falmouth Fire Chief Marty Hart, no flood could put asunder.
WEDDING

Monday, May 5, 1997
A BLESSED RESTORATION
NEW RICHMOND - Members of Cranston Memorial Presbyterian Church gathered at the 141-year-old church Sunday for the first service since flooding from the Ohio River dumped more than 2 feet of murky water in the elevated first floor.
CHURCH

Saturday, May 3, 1997
FLOOD OPENED CHURCH DOOR TO BIGGER CLEANUP
NEW RICHMOND - The congregation and friends of Cranston Memorial Presbyterian Church didn't stop working after cleaning up several inches of flood mud. walls and ceilings, drywalling, replacing aging fixtures, floor tiles and wiring, and replastering - until the entire church was transformed.
CHURCH

Friday, May 2, 1997
SMART REBUILDING TOUTED FOR OHIO
NEW RICHMOND - David and Brenda Rogers led some prominent guests through their Market Street home here, built by Clermont County's Habitat for Humanity. Why? Their living quarters, built on an 8-foot-high foundation, stayed dry two months ago, while around them the Ohio River flooded neighbors' homes.
REBUILDING

FEDERAL TRAILERS AT LEAST ARE DRY
FALMOUTH, Ky. - Steve Lonakers and his family are regrouping and looking for a permanent home. For now, their home is trailer No. 4 in the temporary community of New Hope. Residents began moving in last weekend. The new town is on a hill just 2 miles south of Falmouth, but it seems a world away from the old town.
FALMOUTH, KY.

Thursday, May 1, 1997
DISASTER RECOVERY CENTERS CLOSING
The doors closed at three Disaster Recovery Centers serving southern Ohio for the last time Wednesday night as officials phased out emergency relief efforts from the flood of 1997. Out of six Tristate centers, only the one in Falmouth, Ky., remains open.
CENTERS

Wednesday, April 30, 1997
LIBRARY GETS $20,000 FROM P&G
While thousands of books and a copier machine have been donated, the Pendleton County Public Library didn't have money to begin repairs on its building. Procter & Gamble Co. is answering the call, presenting the library today with a $20,000 check from the company's relief fund.
LIBRARY

Tuesday, April 29, 1997
GROUP TO REPLACE DAMAGED TREES
A Berea-based ecology group will come to Northern Kentucky University next month to distribute seedlings and saplings to replace trees damaged in the Flood of '97.
TREES

Monday, April 28, 1997
SOME NORMALCY RETURNING TO FALMOUTH
Seeing his Dairy Queen restaurant packed with familiar faces made Howard Hoess realize his decision to rebuild was the right one. ''I said I'd reopen and I wanted to keep my word,'' Mr. Hoess said , trying to figure out how to work the new soft-serve equipment. ''But I won't do it again.''
FALMOUTH, KY.

Sunday, April 27, 1997
TEMPORARY HOMES OFFER NEW HOPE
It may not look like much, this dirt and gravel spot lined with rows of white house trailers. But this is New Hope - literally and figuratively.
FALMOUTH, KY.

Saturday, April 26, 1997
FALMOUTH RETURNS TO HOUSING, HOPE
About 180 residents - worried and wishful at the same time - will return to live in their city, nearly two months after flood waters from the Licking River slapped their homes to pieces.
FALMOUTH, KY.

Friday, April 25, 1997
MILLIONS ADDED TO FLOOD'S COST
The bill for damage from last month's unsparing floods has topped $400 million in Ohio and Kentucky alone - with Kentucky's toll still expected to climb significantly.
COST

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR REPAIR WORK
The biggest demand is for people who can paint, put up drywall, help with general cleanup, or repair homes in southern Campbell County and parts of Kenton County.
HELP NEEDED

Saturday, April 26, 1997
ROB KAISER COLUMN
Organizers of Pendleton County High School's annual Project Graduation are struggling to raise money for their festivities in June. But it's hard asking for donations from the people and merchants of a devastated town.
COLUMN

GRANT COUNTY COUPLE COULD HAVE USED FLOOD INSURANCE
Flood insurance could have been Mary and Pat Howard's salvation - it would have paid them money for their home and personal belongings destroyed by March flooding. But the Howards don't have flood insurance.
GRANT COUNTY

FESTIVE EVENT WILL HELP VICTIMS
Officials from the Pendleton County cities demolished by floodwaters are getting a special invitation for Sunday. Tim Baynum, owner of the Texas Two Step Night Club, is asking them to come to his barn. If they show up, he'll give them all the cash he collects from the $10 admission fee he's charging for an eight-hour benefit event he's planned.
LIBRARY

Tuesday, April 22, 1997
LIBRARY RECEIVING BOOKS, CASH
NEW RICHMOND - Money and books are trickling in to the Clermont County Public Library here, more than a month after floodwaters destroyed close to a quarter of its collection.
LIBRARY

Monday, April 21, 1997
A FIGHT TO SAVE THE CROPS
Seven weeks after the March floods, Tristate farmers whose fields were engulfed aren't waiting idly while Congress considers more flood-relief appropriations. They're rushing to prepare what's left of their topsoil for corn, soybean and tobacco - and predicting low yields come harvest time.
FARMERS
FLOOD REPAIRS

PRESSING THE PLEA FOR A TOWN'S REVIVAL
A drive through Falmouth two days after the town was slapped hard by the Licking River sharpened Anthony Strong's need to help. The disaster gave him the fuel he needed to steam forward.
FALMOUTH, KY.

Friday, April 18, 1997
HUNDREDS OF FALMOUTH HOMEOWNERS WANT OUT
By Thursday's deadline, 208 residents had applied for a federal buyout. To some, applying is simply a move to cover all bases. If the buyout does not appear favorable, they can choose other options, such as rebuilding.
FALMOUTH

FALMOUTH HELPS FALMOUTH
"You're one of our people now,'' Jeff Crouch said to Brian Rock. The Rocks had driven all the way from Falmouth, Mass., to deliver a tractor-trailer rig of clothes, bedding, linens, household items and food to the flood-ravaged sister city in Kentucky.
SISTER CITY

Wednesday, April 16, 1997
HQ HELPS WOMEN GET NEW START
Donna Kendall and Marilyn Holt didn't know where to begin to make their Mill Street home habitable again. So the Rev. Joe Boone, pastor at Butler Baptist Church, performed some divine intervention.
THE VOLUNTEERS

Tuesday, April 15, 1997
FLOOD LEAVES FAMILY IN TENT
Mary Cole rushes her 8-month-old grandson out of the biting wind and into the large blue tent that she and her husband have called home for the past month in East Fork State Park.
THE COLE FAMILY

PENDLETON COUNTY LIBRARY DELUGED BY HELP
''We're getting plenty of books, which is wonderful,'' librarian Janie Harter said. ''But it's going to cost $200,000 to fix the building, and we don't have that money.''
LIBRARY

DISASTER CENTERS ALTER HOURS
Flood victims can register for assistance by calling FEMA at 1-800-462-9029; hearing or speech impaired can call TDD 1-800-462-7585. After applying for assistance, victims can visit any of the following Ohio centers to meet with recovery officials:
DISASTER RECOVERY CENTERS

Monday, April 14, 1997
FLOOD RELIEF MAY COME TODAY
The Robertson County fiscal court will vote whether to make a half-dozen families eligible for Individual Family Grants through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).
FAMILY GRANTS

EMERGENCY CENTER OUT OF SUPPLIES
ERLANGER - The cupboard is bare at the Erlanger-Elsmere United Ministries, emptied in the emergencies created by the Flood of '97.
CENTER OUT OF SUPPLIES

Sunday, April 13, 1997
REPLACEMENT HOMES SCARCE IN FLOOD ZONE
FALMOUTH - Shortages in rental housing are literally pulling Pendleton County apart as residents have to move elsewhere to live.
HOUSING RENTALS

Saturday, April 12, 1997
BUYOUTS, BUILDING PERMITS ABOUT EVEN
FALMOUTH - The numbers of building permits approved and buyout forms taken seem to indicate the future is evenly split between residents willing to bet on a new beginning and those who have had enough.
FALMOUTH, KY

Friday, April 11, 1997
CLIFF RADEL COLUMN
Falmouth property owners have voted 139 to 62 for a buyout. No matter how many people stay and how many move on, the city on the Licking's floodplain will not exist as it did before.
RADEL

ALL FALMOUTH'S MISSING FOUND
Daunting at its creation, with more than 500 residents unaccounted for, the list of missing in Falmouth is now void. Everyone is accounted for, according to the American Red Cross.
FALMOUTH MISSING

Thursday, April 10, 1997
FALMOUTH BRACES FOR FLOOD OF PAPER
With more than half their town already relocated to the landfill, residents say a buyout is the only option for recovering from the Flood of '97.
FALMOUTH BUYOUT
STARTING THE PROCESS

Wednesday, April 9, 1997
FALMOUTH VOTES FOR A BUYOUT
With more than half their town already relocated to the landfill, residents say a buyout is the only option for recovering from the Flood of '97.
FALMOUTH, KY.

FEMA HAS NEW HOTLINE FOR VICTIMS
The Federal Emergency Management Agency has set up a hot line to advise flood victims rebuilding their homes or businesses.
FEMA HOTLINE

MONEY POURS IN FOR SCHOOLKIDS
Money is arriving from around the state to help students in New Richmond, where schools shut down for seven days in March after floodwaters forced families to evacuate much of the village.
NEW RICHMOND

Tuesday, April 8, 1997
MELBOURNE, SILVER GROVE SEEK FLOOD LEVEE
Government leaders in Campbell County, Melbourne and Silver Grove pledged Monday to work together to secure funding for a flood levee protecting the two low-lying Ohio River cities.
FLOOD LEVEE

How you can help flood victims
How victims can get help
Special tax rules for victims
Low-rate loans available
Watch out for scams and report them
Tips on repairing, cleaning flood damage
Tips on restoring photos
Health tips
Help on the Web

Monday, April 7, 1997
GAUGE CLOSING CALLED FOOLISH
The nation's flood warning system is being weakened, needlessly placing lives and property at risk, experts at two federal agencies warn.
FLOOD GAUGE

Sunday, April 6, 1997
FALMOUTH HELPERS STAY ON THE JOB
Because of people like Janet Bruin, the American Red Cross is going to stick around this flood-damaged town a little longer.
FALMOUTH, KY.

STUDENTS MAKE RECORD SUB FOR FLOOD BENEFIT
Northern Kentucky University students, trying to set a world record and help flood victims and volunteers in the process, created a 2,500-foot sandwich out of 625 pounds of ham, 450 tomatoes and 260 pounds of cheese.
STORY

Friday, April 4, 1997
WRECKING CREWS FINISH WHAT RIVER STARTED
Ethel Saunders chose to stay inside Thursday - away from the noisy machinery that was devouring her old house next door. Hers was one of about 20 homes in Manchester, Ohio, destroyed by the March flood. This week, crews began clearing away the remnants.
MANCHESTER, OHIO

Thursday, April 3, 1997
FALMOUTH SEEKING RELIEF
If local officials get their way, Pendleton County residents could relocate their homes through a buyout or stay where they are with a flood wall and improved infrastructure to protect them and the Falmouth business district.
FALMOUTH, KY.

TRAVEL TRAILERS BECOME HOME DURING FLOOD REPAIR
Joe Stevens picked a 36-foot travel trailer Wednesday from among five lined up in the New Richmond Village Hall parking lot - and the federal government picked up the tab.
TEMPORARY HOUSING

Tuesday, April 1, 1997
REBIRTH A LABOR OF LOVE
The raging flood waters that engulfed many Tristate communities one month ago have long since receded. But the flood continues to affect thousands of lives as businesses work to reopen and as people either struggle to make their homes habitable or search for a new place to live.
REBUILDING

FALMOUTH FLOOD FUND AT $38,000; $2M IS GOAL
''We want the money to go to the residents, businesses and local government that needs it,'' Economic Development Director Jack Wright said Monday.
FALMOUTH, KY.

Monday, March 31, 1997
PSYCHIC SCARS SLOW TO HEAL
Four weeks after the Licking River destroyed much of this city, the psyche of its inhabitants has changed. Walls are going up and feelings of distrust are beginning to surface.
FALMOUTH, KY.

SUN RISES IN NEIGHBORLY PATRIOT
The annual Easter Sunrise service on the Ohio has been held for as far back as anyone here can remember. This year, however, is different. The Flood of '97 devastated Patriot. But in tearing the community apart, the flood also brought it together.
PATRIOT, IND.

HAMS HOOF IT DOWN TO FALMOUTH
There is a group of nicely aged hams in Northern Kentucky just waiting for their next call to action. These 42 amateur radio operators are the last line of communication when all other forms fail.
HAM OPERATORS

Sunday, March 30, 1997
FLOOD TOOK KIDS' SPECIAL BELONGINGS
Mike Wiggins steered his electric wheelchair past the two heaping piles of rubble that used to be his family's belongings.It was the 14-year-old boy's first visit to what was once his Falmouth home since the flood March 1. His worst fears were confirmed.
KIDS

FALMOUTH DAM PLANS DUSTED OFF
Those who worked on the many failed plans for dams and the creation of a lake system to contain tributaries along the Licking River say the project can't happen without the backing of property owners and communities upriver.
FALMOUTH, KY.

Saturday, March 29, 1997
MORE BAD NEWS FOR TRAILER PARKS
While inspectors surveyed flood damage to New Richmond's five mobile home parks, county officials delivered bad news to park operators: Either move the mobile homes out, or elevate them as much as 10 feet to avoid flooding.
INSPECTION

RIVER DOESN'T STOP FALMOUTH NEWSPAPER
The downtown Falmouth offices and much of the newspaper's equipment and records were destroyed when the Licking River flood struck four weeks ago, but this 90-year-old weekly didn't miss an issue.
FALMOUTH

Friday, March 28, 1997
BUYOUT QUESTION WORRRIES FALMOUTH
Saws and hammers echoed throughout town Thursday as residents took advantage of the weather to work on rebuilding their homes. But the real buzz around town was what to do: Vote for the buyout or wait and see whether a flood-protection program can be financed.
FALMOUTH

Thursday, March 27, 1997

MORE QUESTIONS THAN ANSWERS
The more than 1,000 Pendleton County residents gathered in the fairgrounds' Griffin Center had dire questions about their existence. Federal, state and local officials had called them there to tell them what programs are available for rebuilding.
FALMOUTH

Wednesday, March 26, 1997
KIDS HELPING KIDS
Dozens of pieces of construction paper hang on string from the classroom ceiling. The words ''Kids Helping Kids Cafe'' are written on one side in crayon. Newspaper photographs of the Flood of 1997 are glued to the other side. The 19 students in Stephanie Jones' second-grade class decided to donate their restaurant profits to children affected by the flood .
KIDS

CONCERT FOR A CONCERTED EFFORT
New Richmond High School music students had to pull out of regional and state competition when floodwaters forced the evacuation of their village. Tuesday night, they proved the show must go on, with a concert for more than 500 volunteers who came to the aid of their village.
CONCERT

CHURCHES HOPE TO AID LONG-TERM RECOVERY
The Northern Kentucky Interfaith Commission, a coalition of area churches, is working to help rebuild homes and public buildings damaged by flood waters in Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties.
CHURCHES

Tuesday, March 25, 1997
STUDENTS WEATHER AFTERMATH
Today, The Enquirer begins looking into the faces of Tristate children living in the wake of the Flood of 1997.
NEEDIEST KIDS OF ALL

PARISH ON MISSION FOR CHILDREN
A semi left the Faith United Church of Christ in Hamilton early Monday on a mission. For seven to 10 days, church members had collected toys and clothes for Adams County children whose families experienced the flood.
CHILDREN

FLOOD BRINGS CHURCHES TOGETHER
Newtown's four churches pooled their resources to help almost 1,000 residents during the flood earlier this month. Now that the water has receded and the cleanup is nearly over, church leaders pledge to meet each day to continue their efforts.
CHURCH UNITY

FALMOUTH BUSINESS OWNERS TURN UP VOLUME
The business community is throwing its weight behind a flood diversion plan as Pendleton County leaders prepare to explain the intricacies of a buyout to residents.
FALMOUTH BUSINESS

FALMOUTH STUDENTS UPBEAT ABOUT RETURNING TO SCHOOL
The atmosphere was charged with a bit of excitement and the slight dampness of sorrow. Though the noisy chatter of students made high school Principal Steve Craig say things were pretty much back to normal, underneath it all, they weren't.
FALMOUTH STUDENTS

Monday, March 24, 1997

CITY PITCHES IN TO BAIL OUT NEIGHBORS
''The whole community is giving them everything we can,'' Williamstown Christian member Cindy McGough said. ''We'll miss them when they leave.''
VOLUNTEERS

SPECIAL TAX RULES FOR VICTIMS
Paul Caron, a University of Cincinnati law professor and an Enquirer Money Panel member, says there are several ways for flood victims to get a break on their taxes. Here's a rundown of some basic disaster-related tax questions:
SPECIAL TAX RULES

Sunday, March 23, 1997
VICTIMS WRESTLE WITH RED TAPE
Lisa Meyer said she was one of the first people in Manchester, Ohio, to apply for federal and state assistance. Yet she still hasn't received money to fix her house so her family can move back.
RED TAPE

Saturday, March 22, 1997
FALMOUTH RESIDENTS TO DECIDE TOWN'S FATE
Support is building for razing what's left of Falmouth's low-lying residential section and relocating occupants to higher ground.
FALMOUTH, KY.

RELIEF WORKERS CAN EARN MONEY
The U.S. Department of Labor announced Friday that it will provide $6 million to Kentucky to hire 500 flood-relief workers and $5.5 million to Ohio to hire 400 people to assist in flood cleanup.
RELIEF

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR CLEANUP
Three weeks after the Flood of '97, the Great Dryout is beginning. As communities say goodbye to the mud, they're welcoming cleanup crews. And volunteers are needed. Here's how you can help:
VOLUNTEERS

BODY FOUND IN LOUISVILLE
A man found dead in a drainage ditch probably drowned and may be a victim of the recent flooding, a deputy coroner said Friday.
DEATH

Friday, March 21, 1997
How you can help flood victims
How victims can get help
Low-rate loans available
Watch out for scams and report them
Tips on repairing, cleaning flood damage
Tips on restoring photos
Health tips
Help on the Web

FALMOUTH'S BIG LIFT COULD BE UPHILL
Moving to higher ground is the best way to keep Falmouth alive, federal and local officials said Thursday.
FALMOUTH, KY.

FLOOD VICTIMS WELCOME MENNONITE VOLUNTEERS
Mennonite Disaster Service, a church organization founded in 1950 and dedicated to fixing the messes storms leave behind, plans to stay in the New Richmond area for six months to a year. Volunteers will arrive in shifts, staying one to five days. Many will come from Mennonite, Amish and Old German Baptist communities in Ohio and Pennsylvania.
THE VOLUNTEERS

NO ONE HERE TAKES A ROOF FOR GRANTED
Lucy Aulick can't win for losing. First the flood left her homeless. Now, progress is about to do it again.
CLIFF RADEL COLUMN

PRESERVING PHOTOS
Thousands of snapshots got soaked and soiled by floodwaters. Still, where there are memories, there is hope.
PRESERVATION TIPS

Thursday, March 20, 1997

FLOODED BUSINESS OWNERS LEFT HIGH AND DRY
Every day that Randy Bastin's card and clothing stores remain closed is a day's less income. But federal disaster officials want him and 71 other Falmouth business owners shut down by the March 1 flooding to hold off repairs until the bureaucracy moves into gear.
BUSINESSES

INACTION DISTRESSES TRAILER PARK RESIDENTS
''We just want to know when we can go back to our homes,'' said resident Robert Black. ''You're not giving us any answers. There's people out here who've been suffering for weeks, and we can't get a straight answer from any of you.''
FLOOD INACTION

FEMA: IT'S IMPORTANT TO REGISTER
Federal and state officials want anyone in Northern Kentucky with even the smallest amount of damage from the Flood of 1997 to register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
REGISTER FOR HELP

QUICK ACTION SOUGHT TO APPROVE FLOOD AID
President Clinton requested $2 billion in emergency funding Wednesday for victims of winter weather in Ohio, West Virginia and other states.
FEDERAL AID

BODY OF 20TH VICTIM RECOVERED
LOUISVILLE - Rescue workers have found the body of the 20th victim of spring floods in Kentucky.
20TH VICTIM FOUND

KIDS' MUSEUM TO MOVE EARLY
Flood damage will speed the planned move of the Children's Museum of Cincinnati to Union Terminal, museum officials said Wednesday.
CHILDREN MUSEUM

Wednesday, March 19, 1997
INFRASTRUCTURE REPAIRS WILL COST MILLIONS
Fixing roads, civic buildings and water and sewer mains will cost Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars. Some payrolls will be swamped from overtime to clean streets and facilities, while other towns must replace equipment as basic as police cars and sewer pumps.
DAMAGE COSTS

DAMAGE REPORT
Damage reports from Tristate communities.
DAMAGE REPORT

FALMOUTH SHIFTS SERVICES TO TRAILERS
Rented trailers housing various departments are now scattered throughout the city. Other offices have relocated to temporary spots in space donated by local businesses.
FALMOUTH

DAY CARE LIGHTENS FLOOD LOAD
''The boys love it, and I don't know what we'd do without it,'' said Deborah Bivens, whose family of four spent the past week in a motel after high waters forced them to evacuate their Butler home.
DAY CARE

Tuesday, March 18, 1997
COMPANIES DIG DEEP, PITCH IN
Greater Cincinnati's corporate employers and employees doled out cleaning supplies, cellular phone service, fresh water and food to victims of the Flood of '97. Not to mention two more invaluable commodities: time and money.
COMPANIES HELPING OUT

MISSING LIST STILL DROPPING
FALMOUTH, KY. - Word of mouth is finding more and more people thought missing since parts of Pendleton County were flooded by the Licking River on March 1.
STORY

LIST OF MISSING
Pendleton County disaster officials are asking anyone who sees his or her name on this list, or who knows the whereabouts of people on this list, to call (606) 654-3300.
LIST OF MISSING

DISRUPTED BY FLOOD, SCHOOLS AIM TO REOPEN
With one in five students affected by the March 1 Licking River flood, officials are preparing to help rebuild students' lives as well as their schools.
FALMOUTH

Monday, March 17, 1997
FOR POOR, FLOOD LEFT LITTLE
Tragedy in Adams County lacked the sudden drama of Falmouth, where the Licking River tore through like a tornado and drew the national media, but fatigued workers at the emergency operations center here finally have an idea of their losses: $100 million.
ADAMS COUNTY

FARMERS AWASH IN DAMAGE
The corn-planting season is now four to six weeks away, but Johnny Haitz suspects the recovery will take years. Many of his tobacco beds, which have in recent years produced 40,000 pounds of tobacco, are destroyed.
ENVIRONMENT

DUST, BUGS AMONG PROBLEMS THAT LINGER AFTER FLOOD
The Flood of '97 has other environmental effects, including dust, pests , and petroleum products in floodwater.
ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS

FEMA WORKERS TRUDGE TRISTATE TO GET OUT WORK
On the chance that someone hasn't heard that federal money is available to flood victims, representatives of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) prowled Tristate bars and visited churches over the weekend.
FLOOD RELIEF

FALMOUTH SUMMONS FAITH TO SEE IT THROUGH DISASTER
Falmouth was at peace Sunday, at least for a few hours. In more than one instance, churchgoers came equipped with lawn chairs and folding chairs.
FALMOUTH, KY.

FOUR-LEGGED FLOOD VICTIMS WAIT FOR OWNERS
Anyone who has lost a pet can fill out a missing-pet report at the shelter. If a pet resembling the one lost is found, a reunion can take place, shelter worker Trina Hudson said.
FALMOUTH

Sunday, March 16, 1997
How you can help flood victims
How victims can get help
Low-rate loans available
Watch out for scams and report them
Tips on repairing, cleaning flood damage
Health tips
Help on the Web

AS FLOOD RECEDES, HEROES EMERGE
When circumstances called for extraordinary measures, regular folks became instant heroes in the Flood of '97.
HEROES

BULLDOZER FINISHES WHAT FLOOD STARTED
Two weeks after the waters started rising, houses started coming down this weekend as flood-weary residents grappled with whether to relocate or rebuild.
AFTERMATH

LIST OF MISSING
Pendleton County disaster officials are whittling down a list of those missing or unaccounted for since the flood. About 80 names came off the list Friday and Saturday, but about 200 remain. Officials are asking anyone who sees his or her name on this list, or knows the whereabouts of people on this list, to call (606) 654-3300.
LIST OF MISSING

HELPERS DIDN'T WAIT FOR CALL
Kentuckians are helping each other recover from the Flood of '97. "As awful as was, the one thing that came out of this was that people didn't want to rely on outside agencies to help,'' said Dawn Roeding. ''People pitched in, and helped one another.''


VOLUNTEERS


NEEDED: CAMPERS, TOYS
Adams County is looking for available campgrounds with hookups and people willing to rent motor homes. To help, call (513) 544-6944 or (513) 544-6923.
COPING TIPS

Saturday, March 15, 1997
How you can help flood victims
How victims can get help
Low-rate loans available
Watch out for scams and report them
Tips on repairing, cleaning flood damage
Health tips
Help on the Web

LIST OF MISSING RECEDING
The list of 300 people still unaccounted for in flood-ravaged Falmouth, Ky., is being whittled slowly, with about 50 people found safe and checked off throughout the day Friday.
FALMOUTH, KY.

LIST OF MISSING
Pendleton County disaster officials are asking anyone who sees his or her name on this list, or knows the whereabouts of people on this list, to call (606) 654-3300.
LIST OF MISSING

BARGE BUSINESS GOING DOWN THE DRAIN
MOUND CITY, Ill. - The swollen Ohio is causing a lot of anxious, late nights at Consolidated Grain and Barge Co. And it's costing a lot of money. The company added an extra shift - becoming a 24-hour-a-day operation - to load as many barges as possible despite flood problems. But rising waters have brought traffic and loading to a virtual halt.
DOWNRIVER

VICTIMS ADVISED TO TAKE SOME TIME FOR THEMSELVES
People who have been through such traumas offer the victims some simple advice: ''They should remember to take care of themselves, first and foremost. Slow down and take it one day at a time,'' said Lori Hanson, a St. Charles, Mo., woman who spent months in a hotel with her husband and children when their home suffered heavy damage when the Mississippi and Missouri rivers flooded in 1993.
RELIEF EFFORT

FOOD STAMP AID AVAILABLE
Flood victims in six Ohio counties are eligible for emergency food stamp benefits, beginning Monday.
COPING TIPS

Friday, March 14, 1997
TRISTATE DAMAGE ESTIMATE TOPS $530M
The latest damage estimates put the cost of the Flood of '97 at about $180 million for Ohio, $250 million in Kentucky and at least $100 million in Indiana. And those numbers are rising "by the minute," a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) official said.
THE AFTERMATH

302 STILL LISTED AS MISSING
Trying to determine who is dead and who is alive, Pendleton County officials issued a list Thursday of 302 persons they think are missing.
FALMOUTH, KY.

LIST OF MISSING
Pendleton County disaster officials are asking anyone who sees his or her name on this list, or knows the whereabouts of people on this list, to call (606) 654-3300.
LIST OF MISSING

"SOLDIER BOYS' WELCOME NOW
During the Civil War, U.S. troops took over the small town of Smithland, Ky., to stage their assault on Confederate forts on the Mississippi River.The soldiers are back in town today, but this time the enemy is the Ohio River. And unlike the 1860s, when pro-Confederacy townspeople bore quiet resentment toward troops, folks here see the ''soldier boys'' as heroes.
DOWNRIVER

MENNONITE RELIEF GROUP ARRIVES
The volunteer laborers of the Mennonite Disaster Service arrived in New Richmond Thursday for what could be a six-month to one-year stay.
THE VOLUNTEERS

INMATES HELP OUT, SHAVING SENTENCES
Thirty minimum-security inmates from the Clermont County Jail volunteered this week to help with the cleanup. Every two days of work shaves one day off the inmate's sentence, Sheriff Tim Rodenberg said.
CLEANUP

Thursday, March 13, 1997

Road closings
How you can help flood victims
Advice for victims
IRS, states vow to extend deadlines
Low-rate loans available
Watch out for scams and report them
Tips on repairing, cleaning flood damage
Health tips
Numbers to call for help
Help on the Web

TOWNS DIG OUT; RELIEF FUNDS GROW
As the crest of the Ohio River tumbled toward the Mississippi, Tristate river towns continued to emerge Wednesday from the muck of last week's flooding. Several emergency efforts were shut down, flood refugees received more government money, and a Red Cross relief fund topped the $1.5 million mark.
THE AFTERMATH

LUCKY BREAK AS LEVEE HOLDS
The 325 people of Old Shawneetown, Ill., call themselves "river rats." While most of the townspeople moved up a nearby hill after the 1937 flood swampoed the entire burg, the "river rats" stayed. Now they are staring floodwaters in the face again. DOWNRIVER

'LORD WILL TAKE CARE OF US'
''I'll be so glad when this is over. I am just exhausted. ... I just want a home.
THE ELAM FAMILY

AWAITING NEWBORN BECOMES FOCUS
Life takes on new meaning today for Laurie and Patrick Bass: They'll listen in on the beating heart of their baby.
THE BASS FAMILY

BUSINESSES WONDER WHAT PLANS EXIST TO RECOVER ECONOMY
Business owners and their supporters pledged Wednesday to work with local government to get Falmouth back on its feet.
FALMOUTH, KY.

RESIDENTS PONDER RELOCATING
There isn't enough vacant housing for the displaced families, and federal programs limit or deny money to repair residences on a flood plain.
MANCHESTER, OHIO

NORTHERN KY. RIVER TOWNS TALKING FLOODWALL
Campbell County Judge-executive Ken Paul called Wednesday for the county to explore a floodwall for Silver Grove, and possibly Melbourne.
FLOOD WALL

RELIEF SITES CLOSING
St. Vincent de Paul Society will stop accepting flood relief donations at its eight stores after Friday. Donations can be taken to the group's Queensgate warehouse at 1125 Bank St.
COPING TIPS

Wednesday, March 12, 1997

LOWER MISSISSIPPI WILL FLOOD NEXT
Latest forecasts show the water surging out of the Ohio River will cause flooding all along the Mississippi from Illinois to Louisiana.
THE AFTERMATH

FALMOUTH PLEADS FOR HELP FROM 'FEMA MAN'
Touring flood-stricken Falmouth by foot and car, the director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency promised Tuesday that money would start pouring in within days. ''When you see a whole town wiped out ... you can see it on television, but it's nothing like seeing it in person,'' said James Lee Witt.
FALMOUTH, KY.

RESIDENTS WELCOME DELUGE OF FUNDS
Buoyed by bright sun and warm breezes, Adams County residents began applying for aid in rebuilding their lives Tuesday. They trickled into the fairgrounds, where the American Red Cross, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Internal Revenue Service and others offered help.
EMERGENCY AID

FLOOD SWEEPS CRAIG INTO ACTION
Forty-seven and a half hours after he was appointed disaster emergency services director for Pendleton County, Craig Peoples got a call from county Dispatcher Jackie Stephens. What happened next changed the lives of Mr. Peoples and nearly all of his fellow residents.
THE DISASTER DIRECTOR

BOIL-WATER ADVISORIES TO CONTINUE
Drinking-water treatment plants affected by the Flood of '97 are rapidly returning to normal operations. Yet boil-water advisories are expected to remain in effect for several days in many communities, as health officials make sure tap water is as clean as the water leaving the plant.
THE DRINKING WATER

WATCH OUT FOR SCAMS
They are the easiest - and the most obvious - targets, but waterlogged, flood-weary victims aren't the only ones vulnerable to post-disaster skulduggery. Neighbors wanting to contribute to the recovery process also are attractive prey for the scam artists who flock to blighted areas in search of a quick profit.
SCAMS

CHILDREN'S FUND PASSES $100,000
A Flood Relief Fund established by Neediest Kids of All has passed $100,000 in donations.The fund will help local schoolchildren who have lost clothing, eyeglasses, hearing aids or other special items in the flood.
HELP KIDS

Tuesday, March 11, 1997

FEMA AID HEADED TO OHIO VICTIMS
As the Ohio River continued to fall Monday, hundreds of Tristate flood victims began to see the first tangible sign of relief in the form of federal housing assistance checks.
THE AFTERMATH

FALMOUTH DEATH TOLL LIKELY TO RISE
''With the mass tragedy we had here, five deaths is an unrealistically low number,'' said Craig Peoples, Pendleton County's disaster emergency services director. ''You have to believe you are going to have some more.''
FALMOUTH, KY.

FACTORY PROVIDES GLIMMER OF HOPE
A $3.2 million industrial project will bring at least 50 new jobs to Pendleton County - a healthy dose of hope for this area sick with sorrow.
FALMOUTH HOPE

BUILDERS STILL COVET RIVERFRONT
Last week's flooding didn't come as a surprise to those who want to develop the riverfront, Mayor Roxanne Qualls said. And it didn't change their minds about their vision.
DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT

TOTAL COST DIFFICULT TO ASSESS
The most recent estimate puts the cost of the Flood of '97 as high as $405 million in the Tristate - up from a preliminary estimate of $330 million early last week. But whatever the final tally, the damage will include only part of the economic cost.
ECONOMIC IMPACT

YOU'RE NOT FLOODED? THANK GLACIERS
Unlike many river cities in the Midwest that grew in natural flood plains, most of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky rest on high ground, meaning the Ohio River can't get to where most of us live. You can thank glaciers for that.
GEOLOGY

STUDENTS RETURNING TO CLASS
Schools in flood-struck areas around the Tristate are reopening this week, many having doubled last week as emergency shelters and police command posts. Receding water, too, allowed some schools to reopen.
SCHOOLS

BOIL ORDERS STILL IN EFFECT FOR MANY
More than 140,000 Kentucky residents and about 64,000 Ohio residents were still living under boil-water advisories Monday. Raw sewage coursing along the muddy Ohio River and contaminating wells remains the largest health threat posed by the Flood of '97.
HEALTH CONCERNS

FLOOD INSURANCE DAUNTING
Businesses waiting for their property and casualty insurers to cut a check for flood damage should think again. Then they should get canny.
INSURANCE

STARTING OVER MEANS GETTING HELP
Throughout Adams County, people displaced by last week's floods turned first to kin. Then friends. Finally, to others in their communities. Without fail, responses were warm and embracing.
ADAMS COUNTY, OHIO

AREAS ALONG FLOOD'S PATH BRACED
As the Ohio River recedes in the Tristate, it is rising in parts of Kentucky, Indiana and southern Illinois.
THE REGION

Monday, March 10, 1997
RIVER'S RETREAT SLOWS
The Ohio River in Cincinnati is taking its time getting back in its banks. Forecasters predict it will not drop to its 52-foot flood stage at Cincinnati until at least 7 a.m. Wednesday.
THE AFTERMATH

VICTIMS: WHERE WAS RED CROSS?
As more than 80 people prepared to bed down Sunday in a shelter run by the Salvation Army in Manchester, Ohio, many wondered: Where was the American Red Cross?
ADAMS COUNTY, OHIO

FIFTH BODY FOUND IN FALMOUTH; MAYOR HOSPITALIZED
The death count in Falmouth rose to five Sunday when search crews found the body of 27-year-old Jerry Beyersdoerfer. Meanwhile, mayor Max Goldberg was hospitalized in fair condition Sunday night for an irregular heartbeat.
FALMOUTH, KY.

FALMOUTH'S FLOOD WEARY LOOK TO LORD FOR ANSWERS
As the Rev. Kenneth Gates preached and sang, Debra Conrad remembered the flood's victims. People she knew died. Friends lost their homes and everything inside. The river turned their houses and their lives into empty shells.
CLIFF RADEL COLUMN

RIVER HIT FALMOUTH LIKE A HURRICANE
Nothing shows the nearly unimaginable power of the Flood of 1997 like the devastation of Falmouth, where houses and cars were tossed like jackstraws. The floodwaters carried ''the force of a hurricane wind,'' according to a hydrologist with the National Weather Service.
FALMOUTH. KY.

FALMOUTH DOWN TO ONE SHELTER
Falmouth residents were finding new homes and discarding the leftovers of lost dwellings.
THE SHELTERS

KEY ROADS TO THE CITY TO REOPEN
Some major routes from the east into downtown will reopen in time for this morning's rush-hour traffic, reducing congestion on Interstates 275 and 471.
CINCINNATI

HOMES GO FROM TREASURES TO TRASH
New Richmond residents and business owners dug out, hosed down and cleaned up Sunday, piling shoulder-high mounds of ruined furniture and equipment along streets.
NEW RICHMOND, OHIO

NORMALCY RETURNING TO AURORA
Fire trucks, backhoes and front-end loaders rumbled through the business district, and more than 150 volunteers helped in the massive clean-up in this town of 3,500.
AURORA, IND.

WATER WIPES OUT HOMES OF WILDLIFE
The havoc the flood has wreaked on the homes and lives of Tristate residents is evident. But what may not be as obvious is the disruption caused to the habitats of aquatic life.
THE HABITAT

IRS, STATES VOW TO EXTEND DEADLINES
Ohio and federal tax authorities have extended various deadlines for flood victims to file their returns. Kentucky officials said would announce deadline extensions and other tax relief today.
INCOME TAXES

LOW-RATE LOANS AVAILABLE
Governments and private banks are offering grants and low-interest loans to help individuals and businesses clean up and rebuild. But borrowers beware: Not all loans are created equal.
THE AFTERMATH

Sunday, March 9, 1997

MONUMENTAL CLEANUP UNDER WAY
The rumble of giant front loaders, the droning of water pumps and the persistent scraping of shovels resounded along the banks of the Ohio and its tributaries Saturday as people began a monumental cleanup after the worst flood in 33 years.
THE AFTERMATH

SOME IN FALMOUTH TOO OLD, TOO YOUNG TO REBUILD
Falmouth is taking baby steps toward the historic place it was last week before flood waters from the Licking River ravaged the city. The new Falmouth will be changed. The place will look a lot different for a long time.
REBUILDING FALMOUTH

CAN VICTIMS COUNT ON US FOR NEXT JOB?
The water is gone or going. Mud is not nearly as exciting. The guardsmen and CNN and NBC will be headed off to the next disaster. Our neighbors will need us more than ever. Will we still be there?
LAURA PULFER COLUMN

RESIDENTS KEEP SENSE OF HUMOR
Residents of eastern Cincinnati neighborhoods began returning to their homes to view what wrath the river wrought.
THE EAST SIDE

MUDDY MIX COMPLICATES DISPOSAL OF DEBRIS
Where the once was water, now there is mud. But it is mud sometimes mixed with chemicals from flooded factories, parts of vehicles, construction materials and memorabilia swept from homes and businesses.
THE ENVIRONMENT

WAITING'S OVER, BUSY TIME BEGINS
In the hardest-hit hamlets along the Ohio River, the dance with disaster has changed nearly everything that seemed familiar. The chore for those returning home is finding some normalcy.
ALONG THE OHIO

WATER MOVES OUT, FRUSTRATION IN
As crews from Bromley to Mentor undertook flood cleanup Saturday, many residents expressed frustration with the delay in getting their homes certified by building inspectors and state-approved electricians.
THE SCENE IN NORTHERN KENTUCKY

AS MUD SQUADS START DOWNTOWN, KIDS MUSEUM PLEADS FOR HELP
Cleanup crews worked quickly to remove the mud from flooded businesses, while hundreds dropped by to catch a glimpse of the damage.
THE RIVERFRONT

TOWN TRUDGES THROUGH SLUDGE
Cleaning and discarding was the order of the day. And by the end of it, the ruins of people's livelihoods were put out to dry.
THE CLEANUP IN FALMOUTH

FLOOD WATERS REACH BACK TO TOUCH PAST
Inside the Pendleton County Court House, shut away inside thick oak cabinets, sit handwritten history books from 1859. Flood waters covered four feet of these fragile volumes, but county officials are hopeful the texts can be saved.
THE DOCUMENTS

FLOOD WALLS LIVED UP TO PROMISE
The Great Ohio River Flood of 1997 is not so great in Louisville. The reason: a comprehensive flood protection system.
LOUISVILLE

DISASTER STARTED FLOW OF TOUGH TIMES
The Great Flood of 1993, when the Mississippi and its tributaries flooded the Midwest, left nearly 50 people dead and caused $12 billion in damage. But high water was just the beginning of many victims' misery.
THE FLOOD OF 1993

A SLOW CLIMB TO NEW TOWN; SOME GAVE UP
From limestone bluffs towering above the tiny Mississippi River town of Valmeyer, Ill., Laurie Brown and 900 other residents watched the Flood of 1993 swallow their homes. Four years later, the entire village has move up to join those who decided to stay.
THE RELOCATION

RED CROSS HAS NO LACK OF VOLUNTEERS
The phones are constantly ringing and the doors are frequently swinging at the Cincinnati office of the American Red Cross.
THE RELIEF EFFORT

LUCASVILLE PRISON DOING DOUBLE DUTY
But it is mud sometimes mixed with chemicals from flooded factories, parts of vehicles, construction materials and memorabilia swept from homes and businesses by the Flood of '97.
NOTEBOOK

GENERAL STORE STAYS OPEN TO SERVE TOWN
Business has been brisk at the Mentor Mall, a general store in Mentor on Ky. 8 in eastern Campbell County that escaped the high water and stayed open while much of the town was battling the flood.
NOTEBOOK

Saturday, March 8, 1997
'YOU CAN'T BELIEVE WATER DID THIS'
As the Ohio River and its tributaries continued to fall Friday, the Deluge of '97 revealed a landscape of despoiled homes, miles of foul-smelling muck, and flotsam ranging from toppled mobile homes to overturned cars to smashed china plates.
THE AFTERMATH

WHEN THE RIVER RISES, FORTUNES FALL
Reporter Howard Wilkinson toured flood-stricken Ohio River communities for 2 1/2; days this week to chronicle the damage - and the lives affected.
PERSPECTIVE

FALMOUTH RESIDENTS RETURN TO MESS
When John and Anita Tillett saw their home Friday, for the first time since the Licking River raided the city, they saw it in a heap. The officials' decision to raze it left them with even less than a mess. ''Now we don't have anything,'' Mrs. Tillett said.
FALMOUTH, KY.

REBUILD FALMOUTH OR MOVE IT?
When John and Anita Tillett saw their home Friday, for the first time since the Licking River raided the city, they saw it in a heap. The officials' decision to raze it left them with even less than a mess. ''Now we don't have anything,'' Mrs. Tillett said.
THE FUTURE

PRIZED POSSESSIONS IN RUINS
I haven't cried yet,'' Verna Payne, 66, said on her first day back to her ravaged home. ''But I'm sure I will. I think it's just 'cause I can't believe it.''
BUTLER, KY.

OFFERS OF HELP POURING IN
Offers to donate supplies and services to flood victims are pouring in from across America, and emergency workers are trying to bring those efforts together and avoid their own man-made disaster.
THE RELIEF EFFORTS

SHELTER LIFE: LITTLE PRIVACY, LOTS OF FRUSTRATION
It's 7 a.m. Day 5 at the Red Cross shelter at New Richmond High School, and Les Edwards jumps from the slick gymnasium floor with the same enthusiasm he has shown since the floodwaters started swirling last Sunday.
LIFE IN THE SHELTER

VOINOVICH PLEASED WITH EFFORTS
Gov. George Voinovich toured portions of the flood-ravaged Ohio River valley Friday and said t he also was struck by how people were helping one another. ''These people were still optimistic,'' he said.
THE GOVERNOR'S VISIT

NEW RICHMOND RESIDENTS GET PASSES TO GO HOME
A town meeting, meant to appease frustrated residents, was boisterous but short as people scrambled to line up outside the high school auditorium to receive passes into town.
NEW RICHMOND

NO DAMPENING EAST END REVIVAL
Even in the midst of a disaster and even with her basement filled with water, Gloria Richards doesn't regret moving to Riverfront East in Cincinnati's East End. ''There's something fascinating about being on the river,'' said Ms. Richards. ''That's why we all live here.''
THE EAST END

SCHOOL'S OUT IN SILVER GROVE
Boxes of tissues and crayons floated in one of the stairwells leading to Silver Grove Elementary's basement preschool. Records and materials from the preschool were piled several feet high in the first-floor cafeteria, and the once-white floor of the elementary gym was covered with a muddy film.
NORTHERN KENTUCKY

A FLOOD VICTIM'S SURVIVAL GUIDE
Helpful information for flood victims on repairing, cleaning or caring for homes, automobiles, furniture, floors and walls, appliances, pets, audio equipment, computers and personal items.
SURVIVAL GUIDE

AFTER-THE-FLOOD ADVICE
''The biggest thing you've got to do is spread the word,'' she says. ''Nobody can help you if they don't know you need help.''
ADVICE

RESOURCES FOR FLOOD VICTIMS
James Lee Witt, director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), pledged that federal assistance payments would be made quickly - within five to 10 days - to Tristate homeowners and businesses with flood-related damage.
RESOURCES

HEALTH TIPS
Flood water and post-flood cleanup can pose health risks - everything from contaminated drinking water to electrical shocks to food poisoning. Some tips:
HEALTH TIPS

Friday, March 7, 1997

FOR MANY RESIDENTS, A PAINFUL SIGHT
As waters fell in tributaries of the Ohio River on Thursday, many of the flood's refugees took advantage of sunny weather to return to their homes - or what was left of them.
THE CLEANUP

MOTHER, DAUGHTER DIED TOGETHER
FALMOUTH, KY. - A 14-year-old is the youngest of the four people who have been found dead after flood waters engulfed much of Falmouth last weekend. She and her mother were found together Wednesday in a house trailer on Wilson Street.
THE VICTIMS

A TOWN IN NEED OF RESURRECTION
Those who were allowed past Kentucky National Guard checkpoints Thursday said they couldn't believe what they saw - a city mired in death and awaiting resurrection.
FALMOUTH, KY.

ANIMAL LOVER GUARDIAN FOR FALMOUTH PETS
Carletta Chaney's garage in Falmouth has served since Sunday as a kennel for about 20 dogs entrusted to her by fleeing neighbors or rescue workers who plucked them from abandoned homes.
FALMOUTH, KY.

COPING WITH 'LOSS UPON LOSS UPON LOSS'
Victims of the Flood of '97 will face an emotional recovery almost as lengthy and formidable as the physical cleanup, mental health and disaster experts say.
COPING

COUNSELING SERVICES, AGENCIES AND INFORMATION
United Way Helpline Information and Referral Center is a 24-hour hotline linking people with more than 3,000 local services and resources.
COPING

SCPA REACHING OUT TO AREA PETS IN DISTRESS
The first call came in Monday afternoon - a stranded dog, standing on something just under the surface on the East End's flooded Eastern Avenue.
GETTING HELP

FUND BENEFITS YOUNG VICTIMS
Earlier this week, Neediest Kids of All established a Flood Relief Fund to help local schoolchildren who have lost clothing, eyeglasses, hearing aids or other special items in the flood.
DONATING

BE CAREFUL
As people return to homes that were soaked, here are some precautions:
SAFETY TIPS

SHOVELS, MOPS, BUCKETS NEEDED TO CLEAN MESS
As flood water begins to recede, relief volunteers and residents are issuing a plea for cleaning supplies and personal items.
COPING TIPS

FORECASTERS DEFEND PERFORMANCE ON WARNINGS
As the death toll rises in the Flood of '97, some residents of stricken areas are questioning whether there was adequate warning of the disaster.
THE EVACUATION SYSTEM

TRAVEL TIPS
Information about road conditions, including weather, accidents and delays, is available via the Internet and phone.
COPING TIPS

THE ROAD CLOSINGS
Clough Pike between Ohio 32 and Turpin Hills.
COPING TIPS

FLOATING DEBRIS POSES DANGER
In an epic flood like this one, containers lugging hazardous materials can be more hazardous than the materials.
DEBRIS

CITY OFFICIALS GROUP AREAS FOR POST-FLOOD CLEANING PLAN
Under the city's cleanup plan unveiled Thursday, neighborhoods have been grouped into five areas. Each area will have a response team of city employees assigned to it. A service center will also be opened in each region. Details on the service centers are to be released today.
RECOVERY

FORECASTERS DEFEND PERFORMANCE ON WARNINGS
As the death toll rises in the Flood of '97, some residents of stricken areas are questioning whether there was adequate warning of the disaster.
THE EVACUATION SYSTEM

NEIGHBORS PITCH IN ON CLEANUP
Wamsley, with fewer than 60 residents, possibly was the hardest hit Adams County community.
ADAMS COUNTY

PICTURESQUE RIVER TOWN WAS ON A ROLL AND THEN - SNAKE EYES
Now residents and businesses are grappling with what Mayor Kelly said is the community's ninth-highest flood. It has affected half the businesses downtown and an as-yet unknown number of residents.
AURORA

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS SIDELINED FROM REGULAR DUTIES, BUT ACTIVE
A dozen bus drivers for New Richmond schools have become the dynamos of the volunteer effort in this village where 85 percent of the residents have been run out of their homes by the Ohio River.
CLERMONT COUNTY

RESIDENTS JUST GO WITH FLOW (AGAIN)
The unforgiving Ohio River had reduced the for-sale sign in George Kramer's East End yard to the top half of the word Coldwell.
EAST END

FLOATING RESTAURANTS ALONG KENTUCKY SHORE TAKING BIGGEST HIT
''I figure we're losing about $10,000 to $15,000 a day per (business),'' Mr. Bernstein said. Like many riverfront businesses, his establishments have been closed since Sunday night.
BUSINESSES

DREAMS, TOO, ARE FOUND RUINED
BUTLER, Ky. - Two weeks ago, Rich and Pat Danehe bought a two-story house on Mill Street and then invested thousands of dollars to remodel it.
BUTLER, KY.

BIG RED NOSE CURES THE BLUES
The circus was flooded out in Cincinnati this week, so performers visited flood disaster sites while they were in town. They put on a show for flood victims in New Richmond on Wednesday.
THE CIRCUS

NEW KENTON CENTER UP TO TASK
ERLANGER - The new Kenton County emergency operations center, which underwent a trial by flood, is receiving high marks from the officials who created and use it.
THE RESPONSE

GAS LEAK FORCES CUTOFF AT SHELTER
A gas leak Thursday at the Bromley Fire Department - a temporary shelter to six homeless Kenton County flood victims and a meal site for about 40 - forced Cinergy representatives to cut off power to a gas stove.
AT A GLANCE

KENTON, CAMPBELL, GALLATIN ADDED TO DISASTER AREAS
HEBRON - Three Northern Kentucky counties have been declared federal disaster areas, making residents, businesses and governments in those areas eligible for money and other assistance.
THE RELIEF EFFORT

CLUB'S SHOW WILL GO ON, FOR FLOOD DONATIONS
The musical comedy, written and directed by Cold Spring native Kevan Brown, has been extended a week to raise relief funds for flood victims.
AT A GLANCE

POSTAL WORKERS MOVE OFFICES TO MOVE LETTERS
MENTOR - Not even the Flood of '97 has kept Northern Kentucky postal workers from their appointed rounds.
THE MAIL

FEDERAL AID WINS CHEERS
''I guess everybody's worst nightmare now is the people trying to get back into their homes to clean up the mud, the germs, the smell, everything,'' said Ed Pendery, Campbell County deputy judge-executive.
CAMPBELL AND KENTON COUNTIES

Thursday, March 6, 1997

RETREAT MAY TAKE A WEEK
While the Ohio is expected to stay above flood stage for a week, the receding Licking River revealed a grim toll in the decimated city of Falmouth, Ky.: three more dead in the worst natural disaster in that community's history. Twenty people remain missing there.
THE REGION

HOMES AND HEARTS TORN APART
FALMOUTH - Clouds hung low and the sky was dark and somber over downtown Falmouth on Wednesday, as if in mourning for the lives stolen from this once-vibrant rural town.
FALMOUTH, KY.

RIVER WARNING GAUGE LOST TO '94 BUDGET CUT
An electronic river gauge that might have given residents of Falmouth, Ky., earlier warnings of rising water was abandoned in 1994 for budget reasons.
FALMOUTH, KY.

WORST TIMES BRING OUT BEST
The volunteer relief effort grows each day, playing out in small churches and large high school gymnasiums. Grandparents. Corporate workers. School bus drivers. Neighbors. And in many cases, their children.
THE VOLUNTEERS

FEMA CHIEF VOWS FAST ACTION
FEMA Director James Lee Witt said his agency is under pressure from the Clinton administration to ''move fast and cut the red tape.''
THE FEDERAL RESPONSE

1937 LED TO CONTROLS
In 1937, the Ohio had no flood-protection system. Seven months before the flood, President Franklin D. Roosevelt had signed legislation ordering the Army Corps of Engineers to begin constructing flood protection for the Ohio and other major rivers. The '37 flood sped that effort.
HISTORY

WHY FALLING RAIN DOESN'T ALWAYS EQUAL RISING RIVER
Even with a half-inch to an inch of rain, the Ohio River is expected to keep falling after cresting Wednesday at 64.7 feet, forecasters say.
EXPLANATIONS

FEW AREA HOMES COVERED FOR FLOOD DAMAGE
Thousands of Tristate flood victims may suffer a second catastrophe when they discover their homeowners' policies do not cover flood damage.
INSURANCE

TRISTATE LENDS A HAND TO FLOOD VICTIMS
Dozens of organizations, companies and charities in Greater Cincinnati have rallied to help victims of the flood. Here are ways to donate food, goods, services or money:
COPING TIPS

PLAY IT SAFE WHEN RETURNING TO MUDDY HOME
As the flood water recedes, here are tips for those returning to their homes:
SAFETY TIPS

NO PHONE, NO POWER, NO ACCESS
Frank Albi has unpleasant news for riverfront businesses that fear losing records to flooding: ''It's probably too late.''
BUSINESSES

LOOTING NO PROBLEM IN TRISTATE
Despite rumors that looters were hitting evacuated homes and businesses in the Tristate, police said Wednesday they had no confirmed accounts of criminal activity.
KEEPING WATCH

FOR BOY, 13, 'MISSION' IS A LARK
The 13-year-old boy insisted his motives were self-serving: He simply wanted to ride in one of the Ohio National Guard Humvees, the high-mobility vehicles used by the military.
THE GUARD

ROAD CLOSINGS
COPING TIPS

DETOURS CAN DRIVE MOTORISTS CRAZY
Cincinnati City Manager John Shirey urged motorists Wednesday to carpool or take buses.
THE COMMUTE

SITES ONLINE OFFER HELP WITH A FLOOD EMERGENCY
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has a section on ''Help After a Disaster'' that offers information about applying for federal assistance, finding food, clean water, housing and counseling after a flood.
ON THE WEB

RESIDENTS WATCH SAFELY AS FLOOD ENGULFS BUSINESS AREA
Visitors have come to Rabbit Hash, Ky., to gawk at the flood water engulfing the tiny rural community's several buildings that are grouped together on Lower River Road near the Ohio River in western Boone County.
RABBIT HASH, KY.

RELIEF MONEY PROMISED
FALMOUTH, Ky. - Kentucky Gov. Paul Patton, who toured this ravaged community Wednesday, turns his attention today to Northern Kentucky.
DISASTER FUNDING

DISASTER AREAS
These are the Kentucky counties that have been declared federal disaster areas, as well as those that Gov. Paul Patton asked Wednesday to be added to the list:
DISASTER AREAS

EVACUEES ANXIOUS TO RETURN HOME
In Bromley, a tearful Myriah Hamilton returned home Wednesday - or as close as she could - for the first time since her family abandoned their Pike Street home, after water reached the first floor.
THE SCENE

KENTUCKY VICTIMS
As of Wednesday night, Kentucky disaster officials have recorded as many as 17 deaths. The total includes two deaths suspected - but not confirmed - in Owen County:
KY VICTIMS

CIRCUS, KARAOKE PERFORMERS BOOST SPIRITS
Red Cross volunteers in Falmouth spread the news Wednesday night that the circus was coming to town.
KY SCENE

Wednesday, March 5, 1997

RIVER SURGE WILL REACH CREST TODAY
All this for a flood that has yet to crest. Forecasters said the Ohio River at Cincinnati surged above 63 feet Tuesday and is expected to hit 64.2 feet - 12 feet above flood stage - at 4 p.m. today.
THE REGION

ANXIETY LEVEL RISES ALONG WITH RIVER
Pam Shoemaker of Manchester knows she should be grateful that her children are healthy and her family is safe. But facing an indefinite stay in a Manchester Red Cross shelter and no flood insurance when she goes home, Mrs. Shoemaker could only summon up tears and worries Tuesday.
THE REFUGEES

RECEDING WATERS YIELD 2 BODIES IN KENTUCKY
Workers inspecting the first homes to be free of flood waters in Falmouth on Tuesday found the city's first casualty of the Licking River.
THE VICTIMS

HOW TO GET HELP FROM THE IRS
People whose homes or property are damaged by recent storms and current flooding may be able to get an immediate tax refund from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).
COPING TIPS

RESIDENTS RETURN TO DEVASTATION
Residents living in Falmouth's flooded east side had their first chance to enter their homes Tuesday as the Licking River's waters dropped 5 feet, taking the shock of the tragedy with it and leaving behind the cruel reality of inches of mud and the stench of a sewer.
FALMOUTH, KY.

EVERYDAY LIFE STAYS ON COURSE
Chased out of their homes and businesses by flooding, residents in New Richmond and surrounding river towns were struggling Tuesday to bring back some normalcy to their lives.
THE SCENE

EVACUEES WAIT TO RETURN HOME
In Kenton and Campbell counties Tuesday, people affected by the record flooding were impatiently waiting for the Ohio River to return to its banks so they could begin reclaiming their homes.
THE SCENE

MATCHING FUND WILL BENEFIT YOUNG VICTIMS
Neediest Kids of All has established a Flood Relief Fund to help local school children who have lost clothing, eyeglasses, hearing aids or other special items in the flood.
HOW TO HELP

AT A GLANCE, OHIO/INDIANA
Number of evacuees: 30 spent the night at the Columbia Parkway YMCA. City firefighters helped about 60 vacate homes.
AT A GLANCE

AT A GLANCE, KENTUCKY
Evacuees: 150 residences and 25 businesses in Augusta.
AT A GLANCE

DESPITE FLOOD, RIVERFRONT PLANS STILL AFLOAT
With Cinergy Field bracing against the worst flood of its life, Hamilton County Commissioner Bob Bedinghaus defended the riverfront Tuesday as a possible site for Cincinnati's new stadiums.
THE STADIUM

A PLACE TO TURN FOR HELP
''It's a vehicle for us to keep everybody on the same sheet of music,'' she said. ''It also helps us find out what needs exist and what resources are available to meet them.''
THE OPERATION CENTER

IT'S JUST THE BEGINNING FOR VOLUNTEERS
Although more volunteers are needed, especially those with medical, mental health or clerical skills, the number already helping has increased significantly since Monday to more than 500, Red Cross officials said Tuesday.
THE DISASTER RELIEF

SAFETY FORCES OVERTIME OVERFLOWS
Police and fire departments in the flooded areas of Northern Kentucky have not hesitated to respond during the ongoing emergency. But officials said Tuesday say they dread paying the bill for the round-the-clock services.
OVERTIME COSTS

HELPERS DESCEND ON AREAS IN NEED
Businesses, radio stations, schools, hospitals, churches and area governments are working with disaster relief agencies like the American Red Cross to try and provide aid, comfort and hope to those victimized by the high waters.
THE DISASTER RELIEF

RESIDENTS PREPARE FOR WORST, REMEMBER FLOODS OF THE PAST
WARSAW, Ky. - The volunteer fire department had just left with her appliances and big pieces of furniture. Joyce Harsin stood in her wading boots, frustrated that the rising Ohio River was going to force her from her trailer.
WARSAW, KY.

FALMOUTH CAN AT LEAST MAKE CALLS OUT
But thanks to some herculean efforts, people in the flood-stricken city will be able to reach out and touch the rest of civilization for the first time since the waters swallowed the towns on Sunday.
FALMOUTH, KY.

Tuesday, March 4, 1997

GATES CLOSE AS RIVER RISES TOWARD 64 FT.
By 10 p.m. Monday, the Ohio reached 61.1 feet on its way to an expected crest of 64 feet by Wednesday evening. Flood stage in Cincinnati is 52 feet. It will be the worst flood here since 1964.
THE REGION

RIVER STILL RISING, RESIDENTS WARNED
Cincinnati City Manager John Shirey issued a firm warning Monday to city residents who think they can ride out high waters: This is not your typical flood.
WHAT'S NEXT

UNFORGIVING WATERS CLAIM 3 OHIOANS
The icy water of Ohio Brush Creek was rising when John Edward Hetterick pulled his 1996 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera out of his friend's driveway on to Lawshe Road in Adams County late Saturday night.
THE VICTIMS

FLOODING TOUCHES ALMOST EVERYONE
No matter if you were knee-deep in muddy water or stuck in a Cincinnati garage because of rising water, the Ohio River dominated lives and conversations Monday across the Tristate.
MOOD OF THE TRISTATE

'DIDN'T HAVE MUCH TO BEGIN WITH'
''We didn't have much to begin with; now we don't have a thing we can call our own,'' said Hazel Godwin, whose trailer home was smashed Sunday by the rapidly rising waters of the Blue Creek.
ADAMS COUNTY, OHIO

RED CROSS GIVES, NEEDS HELP
Like the rising waters of the Ohio, the flood of calls for help has yet to crest at the downtown headquarters of the American Red Cross.
THE RELIEF

RIVERSIDE FIRMS LOSING INCOME
Ohio River flooding slowed commerce of all kinds in the Tristate Monday, sending businesses to scramble for storage space, schedule alternate transportation or close and wait for a drier day.
THE BUSINESSES

THE DRINKING WATER
While public water systems along the Ohio River have not reported any purity problems, contamination is possible in the event of a pipe break, or in buildings or wells inundated by flood water.
THE DRINKING WATER

AURORA POLICE CAN'T WORK FROM THEIR 1ST FLOOR
In the city of Aurora, water reached the first floor of the police station. Officers moved files to the second floor, and the dispatcher was temporarily relocated to the telephone company office.
NOTEBOOK

CHANGES WASHES THROUGH LIVES OF THOUSANDS
As the flood waters wash through the Tristate, they create thousands of small stories that are major, life-changing events for the people involved. Among them:
NOTEBOOK

SUGGESTIONS FOR HANDLING HIGH WATER
Evacuate. Flood waters rise quickly and can be unpredictable.
COPING TIPS

THE ROAD CLOSINGS
Kellogg Avenue between Interstate 275 and Five Mile Road
THE ROAD CLOSINGS

THOUSANDS FORCED TO ABANDON HOMES
A flood many described as the worst to hit Campbell and Kenton counties in 33 years closed riverfront businesses from Covington to Dayton on Monday. As many as 2,500 people fled their homes.
NORTHERN KENTUCKY

AS WATER EBBS, DAMAGE DESPAIRING
FALMOUTH, Ky.- Daybreak Monday brought hope and heartache to the thousands of Pendleton County residents left homeless by the flooded Licking River.
FALMOUTH, KENTUCKY

FLOODED RIVERS
Here are the rivers in Kentucky accounting for worst flood damage as of Monday:
KENTUCKY RIVERS

Monday, March 3, 1997

THOUSANDS FLEE TRISTATE RIVER TOWNS
The worst flooding in decades swamped parts of the Tristate Sunday, forcing thousands to flee as waters enveloped entire towns. Raging waters caused as many as 12 deaths in Kentucky and Ohio.
THE REGION

MORE RAIN TO PUSH OHIO HIGHER
Greater Cincinnati is bracing for its worst flooding in 33 years today, as the rain-swollen Ohio River continues to charge past its banks.
THE FORECAST

'THERE IS NO FALMOUTH'
FALMOUTH, Ky. - The muddy water of the Licking River left hundreds of people homeless Sunday in this small city described by the governor as the hardest hit in the commonwealth.
FALMOUTH, KY.

WHEN HOME IS GONE, FRIENDS ARE NEEDED
FALMOUTH, Ky. - The town, as far as you can see, is under dirty, brown water. McDonald's golden arches are just half moons. There's an IGA sign but no grocery, a Shell sign but no station.
LAURA PULFER COLUMN

UNUSUAL PATTERN BRINGS HEAVY RAIN
An unusual weather pattern at about 25,000 feet above the Louisville area directed the path of the rainstorm that devasted some Southern Ohio counties and Northern Kentucky. Cincinnati was largely spared for one simple reason: luck.
THE STORM SYSTEM

KENTUCKY DEATH TOLL HITS NINE
A second wave of massive flooding soaked rain-weary Kentuckians on Sunday. Deaths related to the weekend flooding rose to nine Sunday. Officials in Louisville and Jefferson County said Sunday that 40,000 homes and businesses had been flooded. Damage was estimated at $51 million.P
THE AFTERMATH

CLEANING, WAITING, WATCHING
BLUE CREEK, Ohio - A weekend rain of biblical proportions stunned Adams County residents. Many grieved for Jason Hall, a teen-ager drowned in the flood.
ADAMS COUNTY, OHIO

HOMELESS LOOK FOR SHELTER
BUTLER, KY. - ''When we woke up, we could see only this much,''Pat Jordan said as he formed his two thumbs and index fingers into a triangle, indicating how much of his house was still above water Sunday morning.
THE SHELTERS


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