Tuesday, June 24, 2003

Bush: Diversity, not quotas, won


Urges 'race-neutral alternatives'

The Associated Press

SCOTUS RULING:
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

[img]
UM student Ebonie Byndon smiles outside the U.S. Federal Courthouse in Cincinnati Monday.
(AP photo)
| ZOOM |

Court upholds principle, strikes down quotas
Local colleges step up minority recruiting
Local college-bound teens divided on vote
Tristate: Race matters
Putting the court's ruling into context
Bush: Diversity, not quotas, won
Excerpts from the court's two cases
Editorial: For the good of diversity
Guest column: Colleges face new confusion with court's guidelines
Local voices: Affirmative action ruling

Full text of opinions (links courtesy USA Today and Findlaw.com)
Law school ruling
Undergraduate case
WASHINGTON - President Bush said the Supreme Court's decisions on admissions policies that take race into account show that the nation's colleges and universities are obliged to pursue "race-neutral approaches" as they try to achieve the goal of diversity among students.

"I applaud the Supreme Court for recognizing the value of diversity on our nation's campuses," Bush said in a written statement Monday.

"Diversity is one of America's greatest strengths. Today's decisions seek a careful balance between the goal of campus diversity and the fundamental principle of equal treatment under the law.

"My administration will continue to promote policies that expand educational opportunities for Americans from all racial, ethnic and economic backgrounds," he said.

"There are innovative and proven ways for colleges and universities to reflect our diversity without using racial quotas. The court has made clear that colleges and universities must engage in a serious, good faith consideration of workable race-neutral alternatives. I agree that we must look first to these race-neutral approaches to make campuses more welcoming for all students.

"Race is a reality in American life," the president added. Yet like the court, I look forward to the day when America will truly be a colorblind society. My administration will continue to work toward this important goal."




ENQUIRER COLUMNISTS
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Korte: Inside City Hall
Pulfer: The ambassador

SCOTUS RULING: AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
Court upholds principle, strikes down quotas
Local colleges step up minority recruiting
Local college-bound teens divided on vote
Tristate: Race matters
Putting the court's ruling into context
Bush: Diversity, not quotas, won
Excerpts from the court's two cases
Editorial: For the good of diversity
Guest column: Colleges face new confusion with court's guidelines
Local voices: Affirmative action ruling

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