Tuesday, June 24, 2003

Tristate: Race matters



Charles W. Jones
The Cincinnati Enquirer

Officials at major universities attracting Tristate students applauded the U.S. Supreme Court ruling allowing use of race as a consideration in college admissions.

SCOTUS RULING:
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

[img]
UM student Ebonie Byndon smiles outside the U.S. Federal Courthouse in Cincinnati Monday.
(AP photo)
| ZOOM |

Court upholds principle, strikes down quotas
Local colleges step up minority recruiting
Local college-bound teens divided on vote
Tristate: Race matters
Putting the court's ruling into context
Bush: Diversity, not quotas, won
Excerpts from the court's two cases
Editorial: For the good of diversity
Guest column: Colleges face new confusion with court's guidelines
Local voices: Affirmative action ruling

Full text of opinions (links courtesy USA Today and Findlaw.com)
Law school ruling
Undergraduate case
Ohio State University

Undergraduates: 43,993

Minority percentage: 13.7

Admissions policy: Students may receive additional consideration if they exceed minimum requirements in math, natural sciences or foreign language; provide cultural, economic, racial or geographic diversity; have outstanding talents; or have been involved in extracurricular activities.

Reaction: "We believe that the University of Michigan made a compelling case for continuing efforts to increase diversity on college campuses," said Ohio State President Karen A. Holbrook.

Xavier University

Undergraduates: 3,942

Minority percentage: 12

Admission policy: Race is not mentioned.

Reaction: "I applaud the Supreme Court's decision. Few interests are more compelling for our society as a whole than assuring the full participation of diverse and historically underrepresented people," said Xavier President Father Michael J. Graham, S.J.

University of Cincinnati

Undergraduates: 25,627

Minority percentage: 16.6

Admissions policy: Race is not mentioned in undergraduate admissions. However, race, cultural background, unique personal circumstances and age can be considered for admission to UC law school. Admission there also relies heavily on undergraduate grades and Law School Admission Test (LSAT) score, a person's community service or extracurricular activities, employment, graduate work and letters of recommendation.

Reaction: "Although the Supreme Court's ruling has no direct effect on the admissions policies of the University of Cincinnati, it is encouraging that the court recognizes the value of a diverse campus for providing true opportunity for all Americans," said UC President Joseph Steger.

Indiana University

Total enrollment: 98,710 (graduate and undergraduate)

Minority percentage: 11.4

Admissions policy: Race is not a factor in undergraduate admission. However, race and ethnicity are considered in law school admission along with factors including undergraduate grades, Law School Admission Test scores, geography, viewpoint, undergraduate school and field of study, work and community service. No single nonacademic factor receives more weight than another.

Reaction: "The court's rulings seem to ratify Indiana University's practices. Nevertheless, we will, very shortly, conduct a thorough review of all of our admissions policies and procedures so that we remain in full compliance with the law of the land," said interim President Gerald L. Bepko.

Northern Kentucky University

Undergraduates: 11,567

Minority percentage: 8.3

Admissions policy: Race is not specified in undergraduate admission. However, sex, age, cultural or geographic background and race are considered for admission to the Salmon P. Chase College of Law, in addition to undergraduate grades, Law School Admission Test scores, recommendations, graduate study, employment, leadership ability and other factors.

Reaction: "It appears that the decision will have no effect on NKU's current admissions policies. NKU does not use a point system in evaluating potential students. We choose, instead, to consider the whole individual as we continue to seek highly-qualified students," said NKU President James Votruba.

University of Kentucky

Undergraduates: 22,358

Minority percentage: 8

Admissions policy: UK tries to ensure that its undergraduate student body reflects diversity in the community, says Mary Margaret Colliver, university spokeswoman. She couldn't be more specific. Race may be one factor used in considering admission to the law school.

Reaction: "The decision supports a university's decision to consider diversity as one factor in admitting its students. The University of Kentucky's admission procedures appear to be completely consistent with the findings of the Supreme Court," UK Provost Michael T. Nietzel said.

Miami University

Undergraduates: 16,730

Minority percentage: 8.4

Admissions policy: Race, socioeconomic status and geographic background may be considered with other factors including class rank, grade-point average, test scores, recommendations and community activities.

Reaction: The University of Michigan's "approach is the closest to the approach we have here. We look at each student individually. Race can still be considered. That's the important thing in my mind," said Ronald A. Crutcher, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs.




ENQUIRER COLUMNISTS
Howard: Some good news
Korte: Inside City Hall
Pulfer: The ambassador

SCOTUS RULING: AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
Court upholds principle, strikes down quotas
Local colleges step up minority recruiting
Local college-bound teens divided on vote
Tristate: Race matters
Putting the court's ruling into context
Bush: Diversity, not quotas, won
Excerpts from the court's two cases
Editorial: For the good of diversity
Guest column: Colleges face new confusion with court's guidelines
Local voices: Affirmative action ruling

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