BUSINESS NEWS FOR SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 2003
CSX remotes guide rail-yard trains
Paul Wells eases the lever forward a bit and releases the brake button on his remote control. The train immediately starts rolling down the tracks toward a row of freight cars.

Beach rentals running behind
Millions of Americans have realized that it's a great time to rent a beach property.

Online banking needs wake-up call
When it comes to meeting consumers' needs on the Internet, major U.S. banks might need to click up their efforts to retain business.

Tipsheet improved
The Cincinnati Enquirer's free daily e-mail business briefing is even easier to receive. How do you get it? Click here to register.

Jancoa puts employees first
Jancoa Janitorial Services, this year's winner of the Greater Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce Small Business of the Year award, offers extraordinary support for its employees. But it also expects them to be accountable for their work.
Business Notebook
Tristate small businesses that would like to work with government agencies and corporations are invited to attend a Business Matchmaking conference June 17-18 in Chicago.
City's 'Main Street' key
Growing up in Los Angeles, I didn't have a "Main Street." We shopped at the mall and drove everywhere, even to buy a carton of milk. In those years, L.A. was unusual; it soon became America's norm.
Japanese economy stuck in decade-long doldrums
TOKYO - From the jobless scavenging through garbage to office workers lining up at fast-food restaurants, the Japanese are suffering through an economic slump that has persisted for a decade.
Business Meetings This Week

Commercial Real Estate Projects & Transfers

THE GREATER CINCINNATI 100
Top private firms saw recession
Even before the recession hit in March 2001, Greater Cincinnati's largest private businesses saw the tough times coming.


Drees Co. grabs top ranking in the 100
The Drees Co. earned the top spot in this year's Greater Cincinnati 100, but company officials say that the home builder is even bigger now.

Vehicle dealers showed the way
The tech bubble burst, the U.S. economy slumped, and consumers ducked for cover from terrorists.
These 100 show best of can-do spirit
Health care costs bite deep
Accountable to themselves
Habegger posts 50th profit in 50th year
Builder moves up - for now
Floturn flourishes as others fall
Sumerel service adds to revenue
Companies: Outlook for economy is grim
Everclear emerges as true up-and-comer

SPECIAL COVERAGE
Erpenbeck archive
A. William Erpenbeck spent years building a company that appears to be crumbling. One of the Tristate's biggest home builders, the Erpenbeck Co., is under federal investigation for a suspected bank fraud that is affecting lenders, subcontractors and home owners. Click here for links to all Enquirer reports.