Monday, April 28, 2003

High School Theater Review


Finneytown performance a classic

The Greater Cincinnati chapter of Cappies, or Critics and Awards Program, features Tristate high school students reviewing other schools' productions. Today, Finneytown High's "M*A*S*H," which was performed April 10-13. See www.cappies.com for more information.

Finneytown High School produced a whirlwind of TV nostalgia along with its performance of M*A*S*H.

As with a popular movie and the long-running television series, the Tim Kelly play was based on Richard Hooker's book of experiences from the Korean War, set in a Mobile Army Surgical Hospital with quirky doctors and nurses.

Capt. Bridget McCarthy (Emily Moroney) livened the show with her humorous one-liners and brilliant character interpretation. Moroney reminded the audience that women played an important part in the Korean War.

Mandy Stegman played the flirty Lt. Janice Fury, charming the audience with her bubbly personality. Cpl. "Radar" O'Reilly (Jake Mayer) was full of energy as he belted his premonitions to the audience.

Zach Gaines proved he could do comedic as well as dramatic acting in the role of Ho-Jon. Ho-Jon left the audience laughing when he explained to the Koreans about America's "french fry and overheated dog."

Sam Murch was an enthralling Capt. Benjamin Franklin "Hawkeye" Pierce, while Maj. Margaret "Hotlips" Houlihan (Katherine Hensey) blazed across stage as Pierce's and others' fiery nemesis.

The set was realistic, with close attention paid to detail. The use of a real Jeep and a special effects helicopter were highlights.

- Nick Helton, Taylor High School

EXCERPTS:

Stephen Marck, as Capt. Burns, dramatically showed his character's respect for the Army. Stephen's characterization of a pompous, power-hungry captain combined with enthusiastic energy. The actresses who played the nurses all worked well together, as well as with the other characters on the stage. All added spunk and insight to the performance. Their characters handled the rough nature of the war and soldiers with ease and confidence.

- Sara Fledderjohn, McAuley High School

David Nelson, Greg Nelson, Miranda Hovemeyer and Chris Ewald did a fabulous job designing and building the impressive set that set the mood for the play.

- Claire Zinda, McAuley High School

Capt. Pierce and Capt. Augustus "Duke" (Brian Schnur) made up a perfect comedic duo with their quirks and smirks.

- Mike Hensler, Taylor High School

The climax of the show was in a scene with Ho-Jon, played by Zach Gaines, being operated on. The hospital scene was raised through the floor, an amazing feat.

- Susie Metz, Mother of Mercy High School




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