Sunday, April 6, 2003

Ind. takes whack at bush honeysuckle



The Associated Press

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. - A Vigo County park has become a testing ground for foresters trying to control bush honeysuckle, a fast-growing shrub from Japan that is threatening native plants.

Bush honeysuckle leafs out at the first hint of spring warmth, giving them a jump-start on native plants.

Foresters are worried about bush honeysuckle because it quickly displaces native scrubs and understory plants. And in harvested forests, the invasive shrub actually prevents native trees from growing back.

Bush honeysuckle, which grows up to 8 feet tall, was first planted in Indiana in the 1950s to attract birds, with its red berries and flowers. They were also planted for highway beautification and greenways around cities, said Don Rathfon, a forester for Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service, based in Dubois County.

Keith Ruble, superintendent of the Vigo County Park and Recreation Department, contacted Purdue University to offer the county's Hawthorn Park as a test site for methods aimed at controlling the shrubs.

Foresters are using 19 treatments to battle the bush honeysuckle. That includes different herbicides and different methods of applying those herbicides.

First applications began in Hawthorn Park in November, Ruble said, with a chemical company donating herbicides for the study.

The experiment is expected to take two to three years before an effective method is found.




LUCASVILLE PRISON RIOT: 10 YEARS LATER
Spending cuts endanger reform, advocates say
Widow mourns guard's murder
Key figures during the riot

TOP LOCAL STORIES
Census shift costs Ohio $92M in Medicaid
Civil Air Patrol back to future
UC school redesigns itself

ENQUIRER COLUMNS
PULFER: Women at war
BRONSON: Who blows the whistle on media fouls?

TRISTATE REACTS TO WAR
War exposure worries parents
Two fallen Ohio soldiers mourned
Keeping in touch with Tristate military
Dinner for families of troops
School donations requested
How to get involved

BUTLER COUNTY
Oxford manager fights rap show
Miami tuition plan praised for addressing shift
Hamilton invited to town meeting

AROUND THE TRISTATE
Tristate A.M. Report
Good News: Schoolchildren raise dollars to assist Freedom Center
Obituary: Bishop Jasper Phillips was dedicated leader
Obituary: William Wessels was firefighter for 30 years

OHIO
Ohio Moments: Stanbery first state attorney general
House GOP struggles to close funding gap
Candy Bomber eyes Baghdad
Ex-first lady shares tales of 2 presidents

KENTUCKY
Priest's plea is just a start

INDIANA
French Lick casino could become reality
Domed hotel could benefit
Girl gets dose 100 times more than ordered
Ind. takes whack at bush honeysuckle