Monday, February 24, 2003

New IU president may cost more



The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS - The new Indiana University president could command a salary nearly twice what former President Myles Brand earned, but trustees say they do not expect the final numbers to surpass the salaries of other Big Ten university presidents.

IU's 17-member search committee is considering nearly 200 candidates to replace Brand, who left last month to become president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association in Indianapolis.

The board of trustees, which hopes to name a new president by June, has not started talking about salaries yet. But an executive with the search firm hired by trustees said it could take $600,000 to $800,000 to find the right match.

Brand made $392,660 before leaving, which includes $307,660 in salary and $85,000 in deferred compensation for retirement he can get at age 65.

Trustee Stephen Ferguson, search committee chairman, anticipates paying the next president more than Brand. But he said he does not expect it to be outside the Big Ten's presidential pay range of $281,875 to $677,500.




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New IU president may cost more