Sunday, February 16, 2003

Some Good News


Yavneh Day students to get up-close education in Israel

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Eighth-graders at the Yavneh Day School, 8401 Montgomery Road, Kenwood, plan to visit Israel in April as part of the Israel Education Experience for Graduating Students. An Israeli delegation of educators visited the school from Jan. 24 to Feb. 7 and held informal discussions with students in grades 5 to 8.

The discussions focused on Israeli-Diaspora relations, Jewish identity, media bias regarding Israel, current affairs in Israel, surviving terrorism, the map and land of Israel, and the nation's people and military.

Their visit here was an initiative of the Department of Jewish Zionist Education of the Jewish Agency for Israel. It was arranged through Noga Maliniak, the official emissary for Israel in Cincinnati.

Maliniak said she served in the Israeli army 23 years. She was a lieutenant colonel and head of the Women's Corps when she left.

[photo] Members of the Zionist Seminars delegation met with Yavneh students in the Mayerson Activity Center at Yavneh Day School. From left are Israelis Rinat Kedem and Oren Sukenik and eighth-grade students Sara Rapaport and Sara Weil.
(Photo provided photo)
| ZOOM |
She helps coordinate visits by Greater Cincinnatians to Israel, and plans cultural programs in schools and synagogues.

"I even help people here who wish to emigrate to Israel," she said.

She said when students finish high school in Israel, women serve two years in the army and men serve three years before they go to college.

The student visitors to Yavneh have completed their army requirement. Visitors Oren Sukenik and Rinat Kedem debated issues with the Yavneh students concerning the West Bank settlements, religious laws governing marriage and divorce in the Jewish state, and who must serve in the army.

Mitchell A. Flatow, head of the Yavneh school, said the visit to Israel will enable the students to use their Hebrew language skills and visit the sites they studied about in their Jewish history and Israel education classes.

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The number of organs recovered and transplanted in 2002 in the Tristate was up slightly, even though the number of donors dropped from 41 to 39.

David Lewis, LifeCenter's executive director, said 126 organs were recovered and transplanted last year, compared with 115 in 2001.

LifeCenter is the Tristate's nonprofit organ procurement organization.

Lewis noted that the consent rate in the African-American community dropped from 50 percent in 2001 to 39 percent in 2002.

"We are now in the process of doubling our efforts in the African-American community," Lewis said.

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Cincinnati's Runaway Slave production at the Heritage Village Museum in Sharon Woods Park has received a $20,000 grant from Huntington Bank.

The slave drama is being offered to schoolchildren and adults during February in conjunction with Black History Month.

It is an interactive play, giving the audience a chance to live the Underground Railroad experience. The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center assists in the production.

Allen Howard's "Some Good News'' column runs Sunday through Friday. If you have suggestions about outstanding achievements, or people who are uplifting to the Tristate, let him know at 768-8362, at ahoward@enquirer.com or by fax at 768-8340.




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