LOCAL NEWS FOR MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2002
'Strong mayor' settling in
        One hundred days ago, Charlie Luken took the oath of office under a new system that gives Cincinnati's mayor more power than any of his last 23 predecessors.
City council, mayor say more gets done under new system

Secrecy complaints increasing
        The e-mails from the government began arriving in Cincinnati a few weeks after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. 'Be careful,' the e-mails warned. Your business or agency might have information that terrorists want.

Developer holds land county wants
        HAMILTON — Butler County officials are thinking about buying a 23-acre piece of property that's in the planned route of the Ohio 63 extension, but developer Joe Schwarz says it's not for sale.

Prayers ask for race settlement
        Religious leaders are summoning the power of prayer as key negotiations get under way this week to settle a racial profiling lawsuit filed against Cincinnati.

Special cooking at late eatery
        It's after 1 a.m. Sunday and the aroma of jack salmon baking in the oven hangs in the the air.

Conversations on race
        Small neighborhood groups are talking openly about race issues, in hopes of arriving at actions that will make a difference. Today, the conversation from North Avondale.

Special Section

ENQUIRER OPINION
Some Good News
        Don't be surprised if your minister tells you from the pulpit to not only cleanse your heart of sin, but do something to make it healthy.

You Asked For It
        Robert Richardson, Cincinnati's city architect, said the signs on Columbia Parkway — a series of totems — are part of an enhancement project for the historically significant area. The purpose is to celebrate the history of Columbia Parkway with a form of public art. Each totem has an icon associating it with the abutting area.

TRISTATE REPORT
Family away when tree crashes home
        The McSwains of Kennedy Heights didn't feel like going to their daughters' choir practice Saturday.

Man dead, sister jailed
        LOVELAND — A late-night fatal shooting Friday was a double blow for Rodger and Barbara Mendenhall. It involved two of their eight children.

City, hotels split over tax proposal
        Lawmakers in Columbus wanted Cincinnati politicians to speak with a single voice in deciding how to pay for an expansion and renovation of the Albert B. Sabin Cincinnati Convention Center.

Glendale raises water, sewage charges
        GLENDALE — Village officials have announced plans to raise water and sewer rates for the first time since 1997.

Monroe votes on school plan today
        MONROE — Although some alterations have been made to the plans, the new school for Ohio's newest school district will still be one building for grades K-12 and should be ready in 2004, under a design recommended by a steering committee.

CarMax wants permit to build lot
        DEERFIELD TWP. — The zoning commission today will consider a proposal by Virginia-based CarMax Auto Superstores Inc. to build a used-car facility at Mason-Montgomery Road and Parkway Drive.

Nader: Citizens can bring change
        The key to curtailing pollution and preserving natural resources lies with citizen involvement, Ralph Nader told an audience of 1,200 at Xavier University Sunday.

Tristate A.M. report
        SPARTA — The roadwork for an interchange near the Kentucky Speedway is at a midpoint.

Teachers open to Dragonfly
        MASON — Do you know how to get electricity from a cow?

KENTUCKY REPORT
Open house draws crowd at crematory
        LEXINGTON — Kitty Mattingly didn't flinch as she peered into the cramped, dark chamber — the one in which 1,800-degree heat reduces a human body to nothing more than ash and bone.

Kentucky briefs
        St. Elizabeth Medical Center has introduced a radiation seed treatment called brachytherapy to help prevent scarring in patients who receive stents to open blocked coronary arteries.

SPECIAL
E N Q U I R E R   I N V E S T I G A T I O N
Ohio's secret shame
        Instead of keeping people healthy and safe, Ohio's mental retardation system is so chaotic it routinely fails to prevent deaths, correct problems or enforce minimum standards of care, The Cincinnati Enquirer has found.

Cincinnati's unrest: A look at a divisive year
A special section examines the racial unrest of the past year and the many lives it touched.