Saturday, January 19, 2002

Ticket prices in the new Reds ballpark provide something for everyone




By John Fay and John Byczkowski
The Cincinnati Enquirer

        John Allen, Reds chief operating officer, was asked to pick the best seat for the money at Great American Ball Park. He pointed to a seat in the first row of Section 418. It's in the upper deck, next to the signature “Notch,” along the third-base line.

        “It's a pretty cool spot,” Mr. Allen said at news conference Friday announcing ticket prices for the park's opening season, 2003.

        The cost for such a prime location: $16. If that sounds like a bargain in this era of rising tickets prices, that's the idea.

        “It was extremely important for us to maintain affordability,” Mr. Allen said. “Cincinnati, the Cincinnati Reds, have long been known for keeping our average ticket price reasonable, making it affordable to all our fans.”

        The “Diamond” seats were $175 (all 312 are sold), but most of the seats are comparable in price to those at Cinergy Field.

        The Reds have priced 90 percent of the seats under $30 and 56 percent under $16. The team actually lowered the price of “Scout” seats from $80 to $60 because the Reds sold out of $50 club seats.

        “It was a good problem to have,” Mr. Allen said.

        The Reds set their prices largely based on what Pittsburgh, Milwaukee and Detroit charged.

        Mr. Allen said the new ballpark could add $20 million to $30 million to the Red's local revenues, but some expenses will rise. The Reds will pay $2.5 million a year in rent and about $9 million a year for maintenance of the ballpark, expenses they didn't have at Cinergy.

        The new ballpark also will likely cost the Reds money they had received in revenue sharing from Major League Baseball. Mr. Allen said the Pittsburgh Pirates, while in Three Rivers Stadium, received $10 million to $12 million in revenue-sharing payments. Last year, the Pirates' first in PNC Park, payments fell to $1.7 million.

        Mr. Allen said he expects a similar experience for the Reds, so the net effect of the new ballpark on the team's revenues is expected to be $10 million to $15 million.

Seniority key to season tickets at ballpark
Ticket price won't keep fans away
       



Suspect dead after shooting cop
Serious crime soars in city
Air Care pilots master delicate flights
- Ticket prices in the new Reds ballpark provide something for everyone
Seniority key to season tickets at ballpark
Ticket price won't keep fans away
Airport lines move smoothly
Fest puts focus on education
Portman seeks 401(k) safeguards
Tristate A.M. Report
UC moves up in rankings of research institutions
Warren County
Art show
Faith Matters
Court officials at odds in mom's case
Fairfield parent: Why buy Macintosh?
Students experience pioneer life
Ex-sheriff sentenced to six years
Fatal fire brings arson charge
Ohio joins Enron suit to recover pension funds
Three wives, three killings
Bill that protects fetuses in works
Kentucky News Briefs
Ky. Senate leader declines to censure
Licking span won't be renamed
Mardi Gras plan in works