Wednesday, October 31, 2001

UC cancer center gets $60M boost




By Rebecca Billman
The Cincinnati Enquirer

        An endowment valued at $60 million could greatly enhance the stature of the University of Cincinnati's cancer-research center.

        The death Sunday of Adrian J. French, the endowment's trustee, means the university can begin using the money that was a gift of his father, William A. French.

        The elder Mr. French gave $8 million in 1941 to set up a cancer-research institute to honor his uncle, Hastings French, secretary of Procter & Gamble in 1905.

        The money constitutes the largest single gift to the cancer center,said Joseph A. Steger, UC president.

        In 1999, the university dedicated the French Cancer Institute, the research arm of its cancer center, based in the Vontz Center for Molecular Studies.

        Officials predicted the gift would help raise UC's cancer center to the elite station held by Sloan Kettering in New York and M.D. Anderson in Texas.

        “Hopefully we can make some breakthroughs,” Dr. Steger said.

       



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