Monday, October 22, 2001

Local Digest


3 youths, 1 adult charged with robbery

        Three juveniles and an adult were arrested in an early Sunday morning home-invasion robbery in which stereo equipment was stolen, Cincinnati police said.

        When police arrived shortly after 4:30 a.m., the juveniles and adult were loading the equipment into a stolen van parked near the home in the 2600 block of Jefferson Avenue in Corryville, police said.

        Those arrested are accused of breaking into the home and demanding money before taking the stereo equipment. Another person suspected in the robbery fled the scene and remains at large, police said.

        The names of those charged with aggravated robbery and receiving stolen property were not available Sunday.
       

National Guard unit may be activated soon

               COLUMBUS — More Ohio National Guard members have been put on alert to be activated in response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

        The 220th Engineering and Installation Squadron, based at the Zanesville Municipal Airport, was put on alert Saturday.

        The unit has about 125 members, but the number of members activated, deployment dates and possible destinations are not being disclosed.

        The squadron is made up of technicians trained in engineering, installing and sustaining Air Force communications systems and services.
       

Henke Wine adding Westwood location

               A vacant property at 3077 Harrison Ave. in Westwood will be home to Henke Wine, a winery and dining establishment owned by Westwood residents Joe and Joan Henke.

        “Hopefully, we will be organized enough to open with cheese trays and wine at the new location by mid-November,” Joan Henke said.

        The couple operates Henke Wine at 301 E. Epworth in Winton Place, where they opened five years ago.

        The impetus to expand, Mrs. Henke said, was the need for more seats than their current 40 or so.

        The additional location will seat about 80 people for dinner, late lunch and drinks that include the Henkes' own 15 wine labels.

        The location was formerly home to The Window Garden Restaurant.
       

Hearing to explore sewer-line options

               BATAVIA — Officials will outline the feasibility of bringing sewer lines to Washington Township during a public hearing Oct. 29.

        The hearing, organized by Clermont County's board of commissioners, the township and the village of Moscow, will be 7 to 8 p.m. at Monroe Elementary School, 2117 Laurel-Lindale Road in New Richmond.

        Officials from those areas and the Clermont County Sewer District want to hear the public's opinions and concerns.

        “Basically, it's going to be a planning tool,” said Lyle Bloom, with the sewer district. “There's no set date for any sewers going in. It's just a study to show where sewers would be feasible.”

        Many of the property owners in the township have on-site septic systems.
       

Lectures on Afghan history, culture

               History and culture spanning three millennia in Afghanistan will be the focus of a free public lecture 7:30-8:45 p.m. Thursday in Room 308 of Blegen Library on the University of Cincinnati's main campus.

        Archaeologist C. Brian Rose will talk about the last foreigner to conquer Afghanistan, Alexander the Great, and Greek influences on Afghan culture.

        Historian Barbara Ramusack will speak on “Afghanistan and empires: Mughal, British and Russian.”

        Historian Elizabeth Frierson will talk about Afghanistan and the Muslim world in the 20th and 21st centuries.
       

Grandparents raising kids get support group

               Grandparents raising grandchildren can seek advice from a new support group beginning Tuesday.

        The Kinship Care Support Group, formed by the Memorial Community Center in Mount Auburn, will meet Tuesdays noon-1:30 p.m. and 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Memorial's Family Resource Center, 1607 Mansfield St., near the intersection with Liberty Street.

        The group was formed because many grandparents need help understanding their rights as guardians, dealing with school systems and family stresses, and handling financial concerns, said Theresa Towns, Memorial's family service manager.

        For information about the group, call (513) 621-3032.

Carmel Presbyterian celebrates 100th year

               Carmel Presbyterian Church celebrated its 100th year over the weekend with a banquet, gospel concert and special Sunday service.

        The congregation began meeting in 1901 at Lime Hall, located at Plum Street near Seventh Street.

        After three locations, the church bought its present home at 3549 Reading Road in 1958.

        Carmel Presbyterian played an important role in the civil-rights movement during the 1960s, and today the church continues to be active in advocacy and outreach.

        The Rev. Clarence S. Wallace and the church helped develop the Avondale Towne Center, formed a partnership with Indian Hill Episcopal-Presbyterian Church to provide an academic enrichment program for neighborhood children each summer, and developed a parish nurse program with Greater New Hope Baptist.

       



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