Tuesday, August 21, 2001

Authorities bust alleged meth lab




        UNION TOWNSHIP — A Union Township man was arrested Monday after police broke up what they say was a methamphetamine lab in a residential area.

        John Jones, 28, of the 4600 block of Tealtown Road, was being held in the Clermont County Jail and charges are expected, Clermont County Sheriff A.J. Rodenberg said. There were no injuries and no weapons were found when authorities served a search warrant at the Tealtown address about noon.

        Sheriff's deputies, agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration and Union Township police officers were involved in the bust.

        “We didn't find any controlled substances manufactured themselves, but we did find the manufacturing in progress,” Sheriff Rodenberg said. “All the paraphernalia and some of the substances and chemicals used for the manufacture were clearly evident.”
       

41st bank robbed; suspect on the lam

               Cincinnati's latest bank robber dropped his “Jesus” hat Monday as he fled.

        Police are investigating the robbery, the 41st in the city this year. It happened about 12:35 p.m. at Winton Savings & Loan Co., 101 W. Central Parkway.

        The robber was described as a thin black man in his early 20s, about 5-feet-eight-inches to 5-feet-10-inches tall. He wore a white, short-sleeved T-shirt, possibly with red lettering on the front, light blue jeans, white gym shoes and the navy blue “Jesus” hat. He also wore large, mirrored sunglasses and had a light mustache and goatee.

        An undisclosed amount of money was taken. No one was injured.

        He was last seen running south on Ira Alley toward Court Street.

        Police ask anyone with information about the robber to call Crime Stoppers at 352-3040.
       

Medical condition staysdisciplinary hearing

               HAMILTON — A disciplinary hearing for a Hamilton attorney, who is a former city court judge, has been rescheduled.

        Michael Conese was scheduled to appear this week before the Ohio Supreme Court's Board of Commissioners on Grievances and Discipline. He faces allegations that he violated the state's Code of Professional Responsibility for lawyers. The hearing was canceled because of a medical condition Mr. Conese has, said Jonathan E. Coughlan, disciplinary counsel. He would not release details of the medical problem.

        Earlier this year, Mr. Conese was accused of telling two clients that he had spoken to judges and/or prosecutors about getting special consideration for them. He also is accused of keeping $1,000 that he was supposed to use to pay a client's child-support obligation.

        Mr. Conese has denied the allegations, which date to 1997-98.

        His hearing now is set for Dec. 13 in Columbus.

        The committee could dismiss the complaint or recommend discipline ranging from public reprimand or disbarment. The Ohio Supreme Court would make a final decision on any action.
       

Homeless man faces murder charge

               HAMILTON — A homeless man is being held in the Butler County Jail on a $100,000 cash bond after being accused of murder in the beating death of his girlfriend in their camp behind Hamilton Plaza Shopping Center.

        Michael G. Young, 44, will have a preliminary hearing next week in Butler County Area 3 Court. In a court appearance Monday, Mr. Young had an attorney appointed for him.

        The body of Pamela Stacey, 46, was found Saturday morning near an abandoned rail line on an overgrown hillside, police said.
       

Man beaten with log in critical condition

               HAMILTON — A 27-year-old Hamilton man remained in critical condition Monday at University Hospital after a beating with a log.

        Chad Allen was beaten near his home in the 200 block of Starr Avenue late Friday or early Saturday, according to a police report.

        Derrick Ware, 19, of the 5200 block of Middletown-Oxford Road, Middletown, was arrested and charged with aggravated assault, a fourth-degree felony. He is free on his promise to appear in municipal court today.

        Witnesses told police that Mr. Allen had waved a knife and was yelling threats before he was beaten.
       

Expert doctor heading to Children's Hospital

               Cincinnati's Children's Hospital Medical Center has boosted its cancer expertise with a second recruit in two months from Indiana University.

        Dr. Frank Smith, formerly co-director of the IU bone marrow and stem-cell transplantation program, has been named director of hematology/oncology at Children's Hospital. Dr. Smith is an expert in cord blood transplantation, acute myeloid leukemia, and gene-therapy trials.

        Dr. Smith has been a colleague since 1994 of Dr. David Williams, a blood disease expert at IU who was named in July to be director of a new division of experimental hematology at Children's Hospital.

        The appointments of Drs. Williams and Smith reflect continued scientific growth at Children's Hospital, where research funding has swelled about 33 percent in one year, from $48 million in fiscal 2000 (ended June 30) to about $64 million in fiscal 2001.
       

Mount Airy hospital to close in-patient units
               In-patient units that provide 36 adult psychiatric beds and 10 beds for chemical dependency treatment at Mercy Franciscan HospitalMount Airy will close Sept. 3.

        The closing, first announced in June, will leave Christ, University, Good Samaritan and Mercy Hospital Clermont hospitals as the only private hospitals in Southwest Ohio offering adult psychiatric units.

        Andy McCulloch, interim president and chief executive for Mercy Health Partners, said the closing is necessary because the hospital loses money on every patient it serves.

        The closing will result in eliminating 10 jobs. A 14-bed child and adolescent psychiatric unit at the Mount Airy hospital will remain open.
       

Low-income families can get booster seats

               Up to 5,500 low-income families in Greater Cincinnati might be eligible for free car booster seats through a charity program.

        Booster seats are intended for children ages 4 to 8 who have outgrown child seats but still are not big enough for standard seat belts to fit properly.

        The Boost America! program, co-sponsored by United Way, Ford Motor Co. and Children's Hospital Medical Center, has begun screening families for income-eligibility. Families will receive vouchers for their booster seats Aug. 28 at the Cincinnati Gardens.

        For information about the booster seat program, call the United Way Helpline at (513) 721-7900.

       



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