Monday, August 20, 2001

No teachers strike in Franklin


New 3-year contract approved

By William A. Weathers
The Cincinnati Enquirer

        FRANKLIN — Students will return to school as scheduled Wednesday after teachers overwhelmingly approved a new three-year contract Sunday.

        Teachers are scheduled to meet with Interim Superintendent Bill Wood at 7:30 a.m. today in the high school cafeteria to officially notify school officials of the ratification vote.

        Th contract approval averts a strike the teachers' union had scheduled today.

        Veteran teacher Tom Benjamin said members of the Franklin Teachers Association approved the contract with a vote of more than 140 for and only 15 against.

        “I think the vote indicates the teachers in the district were happy with it,” said Mr. Benjamin, who chaired a crisis committee when negotiations hit a standstill.

        The contract gives teachers increases of 5.75 percent this year; 5.25 percent next year; and 3 percent the third year.

        “In my 21 years in the district, it's the biggest increase we've received,” said Mr. Benjamin, chairman of social studies department.

        The annual salary for a starting teacher had been $26,764.

       



Cops take Spanish lessons
Retiring clerk saw council make history
Messages of peace, unity close Reunion
Adults at reunion remember orphanage
Art Academy design is on the bunny
Boone Co. to tap Cincinnati water
Ousted mayor running to regain office
RADEL: Telemarketer's call sells man on warning
-No teachers strike in Franklin
Hoop students return earlier
Building promotes wildlife
Development to draw jobs, traffic
Festival unites people, peppers
Heritage Fest still growing
Congrats
Local Digest
You Asked For It
Boone cops may regroup
College students pick research over summer jobs
Electric chair may end up in museum
Poll: Majority of Ohioans say school funding inefficient
Fund raising starts early
Have a tax reform idea? Step in line
License plates a tricky mix of vanity fare
Mammoth Cave concern raised