LOCAL NEWS FOR SUNDAY, JULY 29, 2001
A child scarred by violence
        The youngest, most innocent casualty of Cincinnati's unprecedented violence will heal physically. But doctors remain uncertain about his psychological well-being.
Peace rally echoes calm following shooting

Price wars fierce at the pump
        Some of the fiercest competition in America is happening at nearly every major intersection in Greater Cincinnati.
BP vs. Speedway: a battle for turf

After 11 days, flood cleanup rages
        FAIRFAX — There are rugs to clean, flooring to install and walls to restore, but Luke Phourest is working on a small shard of glass for his neighbor.

TRISTATE HEADLINES
Debate over bridge colors isn't new
        COVINGTON — The recent hue and cry over what color to paint the Roebling Suspension Bridge is not the first time Greater Cincinnati bridge colors have been debated.

Future of ATP center up in air
        MASON — The most cost-effective method of retaining the Tennis Masters Series Cincinnati in Greater Cincinnati is to continue operation at the site off Interstate 71, according to a feasibility study.

Job fair draws about 100 hopefuls
        Tiffany Resses likes being around children. She likes to baby sit. She has worked at a Wendy's. Now she sat before a panel of three for her second and final interview of the day.

Olympic proposal difficult to score
        In the end, the less-than-obvious factors might help decide whether Cincinnati gets the 2012 Olympics.

Players' group is a United Nations in miniature
        Jim Bracht, a tall, gray-bearded retiree with an admitted resemblance to Santa Claus, considers himself a student of diversity, one table tennis game at a time.

Tristate A.M. Report

SUNDAY FORUM
Looking back to when they were looking up
        There's the pimply teen at the favorite burger joint, the one mowing with a mowhawk, and don't forget the lifeguard at the neighborhood pool. We were all teens once, spending our summers in menial jobs.

Summer jobs aid transition to adulthood
        My towels hang on a rack as trophies. They are the envy of the rest of the bathroom. When the light switch points up, a vanity mirror illuminates the room to spotlight the towels.

ENQUIRER COLUMNISTS
CROWLEY: Ky. Politics
        Ken Lucas — a man without a party.

PULFER: Paul betrothed
        The first time Paul McCartney announced marriage plans, I was devastated. I had always assumed there might be a future for us. Even though Paul and I were not dating at the time. Or, actually, ever in the same city together. But we were young — there was still time.

WILKINSON: Politics
        If you are still wondering why Hamilton County Commissioner Tom Neyer Jr. decided not to run for re-election next year, you should have been with us at the Reds-Tigers game a couple of weeks ago.

BUTLER, WARREN, CLERMONT
Cleanup needed after flooding
        WEST CHESTER TWP. — Volunteers are needed to help clean up Heritage Village Museum in Sharon Woods Hamilton County Park, where flooding from heavy rains July 17 caused an estimated $120,000 damage.

Indicted city manager still at job
        LEBANON — Early indications are that City Manager James Patrick will still have a job this week, in spite of being indicted on four felony charges Friday.

Landfill site debate on way to court
        LEBANON — Warren County officials go to court Monday in hopes of preventing a landfill from reopening between South Lebanon and Morrow.

New library a focal point
        FAIRFIELD — The focal point of the city's village green project, the new Fairfield Branch of the Lane Public Library, looms over the growing development west of City Hall across Pleasant Avenue.

OHIO HEADLINES
Black officer faces profiling charge
        COLUMBUS — The city's police chief has recommended that an officer be fired in connection with an allegation that he arrested a man in January because he assumed the man was an illegal Mexican immigrant.

Lake Erie cleaner, but sewage runoff persists
        OREGON, Ohio — Despite years of testing and millions of dollars spent to fix septic tanks and sewage systems, it likely will take many more years to win the battle against harmful bacteria levels in Lake Erie.

Naked Cowboy back in New York
        NEW YORK — Just when you thought Times Square had cleaned up its image and lost its wacky edge, Cincinnati's own Naked Cowboy is back.

NORTHERN KENTUCKY
A legacy of two families
        FORT MITCHELL — How did Northern Kentucky's wonderful rehabilitation center “Redwood” acquire its name? The school was named in honor of Bill and Sue Reder and Al and Dorothy Wood.

Critics say Patton slights farmers
        NEW CASTLE, Ky. — A farm advocacy group says Gov. Paul Patton is favoring business, not local folks, by hiring a Harvard consultant to write a long-term plan for Kentucky agriculture.

Group eyes Newport changes
        NEWPORT — Newport's downtown business district, anchored by the various shops and businesses on Monmouth Street, will soon be known as “South of the Levee” if the new chairman of the Newport Business Association has anything to say about it.

Judge, prosecutor recuse selves in trial
        BURLINGTON — A sheriff's deputy accused of assaulting a juvenile prisoner will be tried by officials from another county because he is so well-known in Boone and Kenton counties.

AROUND KENTUCKY
New school superintendent oversees shakeup
        LEXINGTON — Fayette County has seen an alarming turnover among principals since Robin Fankhauser became the county's school superintendent.

Taxi drivers say state not being fair by not paying fares
        ASHLAND, Ky. — Taxi drivers across northeastern Kentucky are complaining the state hasn't paid about $100,000 in bills for driving low-income people to work and to medical appointments.

UK program gives teen girls exposure to science careers
        LEXINGTON — When Jenna Patton entered the University of Kentucky's Young Women in Science project, she thought it might be a fun way to strengthen her background in science and mathematics.