TOP LOCAL NEWS FOR SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2001
Police review themselves when citizens complain
        Hundreds of people complain every year about the behavior of Cincinnati police officers. They say officers curse them, mock their distress, refuse help and get nasty when confronted with their discourtesy. But every year, more than 90 percent of minor complaints against officers are dismissed.
Police talk up 'customer service'

Families withhold organ consent
        More than 40 percent of families with loved ones who could be organ donors refuse to give consent after they die — a situation researchers attribute to widespread misunderstanding about the process.
Donations decline 36% from last year
Religious stances on organ donation

Charter's choice bucks group's origins
        The Charter Committee's candidate for Cincinnati mayor, Courtis Fuller, is running for an office under a new system that might make the original Charterites scratch their heads in wonder.
Charter history

TRISTATE HEADLINES
School buildings getting more uses
        The days when school buildings lock up for the summer and sit mostly unused after school hours are fading fast. Across Greater Cincinnati, school facilities increasingly are home to banks, recreation facilities and satellite medical offices — some open day and night.

Police capture man who fled from hospital
        SPRINGFIELD TOWNSHIP — A Cumminsville man who escaped from police custody at University Hospital after being charged with assaulting two officers was captured Saturday afternoon.

Three finalists in world piano contest
        World Piano Competition judges announced finalists in the 54th annual contest Saturday.

Local Digest
        SHARONVILLE - A 20-year-old Clermont County woman might have suffered a seizure before she died Saturday in a two-car crash on Interstate 275 near the U.S. 42 interchange.

Tristate's Priciest Homes
        The top residential real estate transfers in Greater Cincinnati, compiled by First American Real Estate Solutions:

ENQUIRER COLUMNISTS
WILKINSON: Neyer's choice was clear
        Homer Simpson has a word for what Tom Neyer Jr. went through the past five years as a Hamilton County Commissioner. The word is D'oh!

BRONSON: Avoid golf magazines
        Every time I get a haircut, I bury my face in a golf magazine to soak up helpful tips and learn about the latest super-duper uranium-faced clubs and high-performance, nuclear-core golf balls while Frank the barber snips away. Most guys dream of shooting par. I just hope to break 90 before I run out of hair.

BUTLER, WARREN, CLERMONT
Tupperware key find in arrest
        A Tupperware container may be a key piece of evidence that investigators used to link the death of Army Sgt. Laura Cecere to her estranged husband.

Strip club disputes claims
        UNION TOWNSHIP — A search warrant served Friday night on Deja Vu Showgirls in Mount Carmel contained vague allegations of prostitution, an attorney representing the strip club said Saturday.

Families vie for reality-TV roles
        MASON — More than 40 eager families drove up to six hours to Paramount's Kings Island Saturday to convince casting agents they're real enough to star in a new reality TV series. The shows will record four families living and competing in challenges and games on a South Pacific Island.

Kids invited to 'beach party'
        SOUTH LEBANON — Youths of all ages are invited to participate in “Fun At The Beach Day,” 1-4 p.m. Monday at South Lebanon Elementary Park, across from the elementary school on High Street.

NORTHERN KENTUCKY
Tax hikes rouse Kenton race
        INDEPENDENCE — Kenton County Judge-executive Dick Murgatroyd has opened his 2002 re-election campaign with accomplishments and ideas that don't make headlines but with problems that do.

CROWLEY: N.Ky. chamber to enter war zone
        Ever watch one of those summer thriller flicks with names like "I Know What You Did Last Week in Ludlow" and "A Teen-ager is About to Walk into a Room Where You and Everybody Else Knows the Slasher is Hiding?"

Market moves, business grooves
        DRY RIDGE — Rural tradition and rural growth came together Saturday at the grand opening of the Grant County Farmers Market at its new location in the Dry Ridge Outlet Center.

AROUND OHIO, KENTUCKY, INDIANA
Police sergeant claims racial profiling
        LOUISVILLE — A city police sergeant filed a federal lawsuit against the Jefferson County Police Department and two of its officers, claiming he was a victim of racial profiling.

Ex-Marine enters convent
        LOUISVILLE — Mary Perrot suffered through boot camp,learned to shoot straight enough to earn the rank of Marine gunnery sergeant, and served six months in Operation Desert Storm. Now, after 20 years in the military, she is signing up for a different tour of duty.

Artificial heart recipient resting comfortably
        LOUISVILLE — The first patient to receive a self-contained artificial heart was resting comfortably on a ventilator Saturday at the hospital where the surgery was performed.

Awaiting hearts, they see new hope
        LOUISVILLE — Jim Pray has waited more than nine months in a hospital room for a heart transplant.

Power grid at risk with more plants
        LOUISVILLE — With two dozen new electric generating plants planned around the state, Kentucky's energy exports might soon mean something more than coal shipments from Appalachia and Western Kentucky.

Historic bridge to be replaced
        PORTSMOUTH, Ohio — Before the Ulysses S. Grant Bridge was constructed nearly 75 years ago, people traveling to work here crossed the Ohio River in small boats, often using their oars to push away ice during winter.

Kentucky Digest
        OWEN COUNTY — Eight people were injured, six seriously, in a two-vehicle crash east of Owenton Saturday afternoon.

'Melungeons' turn to DNA on heritage
        VARDY, Tenn. — The hundreds who came here in search of their past listened with rapt attention, responding with knowing nods as Brent Kennedy told a tale that has become all too familiar in these hills.

Museum, eatery stake name claim
        COLUMBUS — A science museum says a New York City-based chain of sandwich shops is welcome to come to central Ohio, as long as it changes its name.