Monday, January 01, 2001

Inside the body mass index




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        The body cannot store protein or carbohydrates so if you eat more calories than you burn off through exercise, you gain weight because your body stores it as fat. One pound of excess fat is equal to about 3,500 calories.

        Being overweight and being obese are not the same thing. One of the best ways to determine how risky your extra pounds may be is to calculate your Body Mass Index (BMI).

        To calculate BMI, multiply your weight in pounds by .45. Then, multiply your height in inches by .0254 and square the result. Divide the pounds answer by the inches. The resulting number is your BMI.

        There are many BMI calculators online that do the math for you instantly (try www.kcnet.com or www.caloriecontrol.org or www.healthcentral.com).

        Some facts gleaned from these online sites, if your BMI is:
        • 19 to 22, you probably will live the longest.
        • 24 or less, you are at a healthy weight.
        • 25 to 29.9, you are overweight. Death rates begin getting higher for people at this level.
        • 30 and higher, you are obese.

Tristate body mass index
        • Hamilton County: 16.2 percent of adults have a body mass index (BMI) higher than 30.
        • Ohio: 20.1 percent of the adult population is obese, with a BMI of 30 or more.
        • The nation: 19.7 percent of adults, on average, have a BMI higher than 30.

How we stack up: Tristate vs. nation
        Percentage of overweight residents (a BMI of 25 to 29.9) in 1999
        • U.S. 36.8
        • Ohio 36.7
        • Kentucky
        • Indiana 36.9

        Percentage of adults reporting no leisure-time physical activity in 1998
        • U.S. 27.7
        • Ohio 29.9
        • Kentucky 42.6
        • Indiana 27.1

        Percentage of adults eating fewer than five servings of fruit and vegetables a day in 1998
        • U.S. 76.2 percent
        • Ohio 84
        • Kentucky 84.3
        • Indiana 76.5

        Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

Where we sweat
        Health and fitness club growth:

        • U.S.: In 1995, there were 12,608 health and fitness clubs nationwide. In 2000, there were 15,910 health and fitness clubs nationwide. At the end of 1999, 30.6 million Americans belonged to health or fitness clubs.

        • Ohio: In 1995, the state had 472 health and fitness clubs. In 2000, there were 536 clubs statewide. At the end of 1999, 1.2 million state residents belonged to health or fitness clubs.

        • Kentucky: In 1995, Kentucky had 171 health and fitness clubs. In 2000, there were 198 clubs statewide. At the end of 1999, 280,000 Kentuckians were members of health or fitness clubs.

        • Indiana: In 1995, Indiana had 267 health and fitness clubs. In 2000, there were 268 clubs statewide. At the end of 1999, 419,000 state residents were members of health or fitness clubs.

       



Main story
Infographic: Fat and what it does to your body
Fat City Statistics
- Inside the body mass index
Balance of diet, exercise, attitude shape foundation for healthy body
Scientists search for obesity's causes and cures
The Cincinnati Diet
Week 1 diet plan
Weight-loss programs need three components
12 reasons to celebrate in 2001
Dad learns true meaning of football from daughter
Get to It