Wednesday, December 06, 2000

More pay sought for hazardous work




The Associated Press

        LEXINGTON — The crusade by Fayette County solid-waste department workers for better pay and benefits has swelled to include at least six other city divisions.

        The employees say they work in hazardous jobs but don't earn enough to support their families.

        “We've gotten letters from just about every group that's out there,” said city Human Resources Director Wally Skiba.

        Urban County Council members announced a city committee that will attempt to define hazardous conditions in the workplace. The committee will include council members, city employees and representatives of the departments that have asked for the hazardous-duty designation. They are solid waste, streets and roads, traffic engineering, parks and recreation, building maintenance and construction, sanitary sewers and fleet services.

        Corrections officers at the jail became the first city employees to join the state's hazardous-duty retirement program this summer.

       



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