Republican National Convention
Tuesday, August 01, 2000

Scenes from Philly


The new Gingrich

        It's back to just plain old Newt.

        Four years after his star shone brightly at the Republican convention, Newt Gingrich is back. But the House speaker title is long gone.

        So are the entourages, security details and endless, rushed schedules he kept in 1996 at the convention in San Diego, when he nearly overshadowed nominee Bob Dole.

        This time, he's just another political analyst — for Fox News in his case.

        “This is very much like when before I was speaker,” Mr. Gingrich said Monday during a casual stroll outside. “Just walking around and talking to people and talking about ideas.”

        Later, Mr. Gingrich walked right into a march for the homeless. Demonstrators jeered that they had a sign “with his name on it.”

        “I'm actually glad to see that the protesters are coming through this neighborhood, because it will draw attention to how Republicans at the convention are working hard to rebuild inner-city communities,” Mr. Gingrich said.

The new Gingrich
        It's back to just plain old Newt.

        Four years after his star shone brightly at the Republican convention, Newt Gingrich is back. But the House speaker title is long gone.

        So are the entourages, security details and endless, rushed schedules he kept in 1996 at the convention in San Diego, when he nearly overshadowed nominee Bob Dole.

        This time, he's just another political analyst — for Fox News in his case.

        “This is very much like when before I was speaker,” Mr. Gingrich said Monday during a casual stroll outside. “Just walking around and talking to people and talking about ideas.”

        Later, Mr. Gingrich walked right into a march for the homeless. Demonstrators jeered that they had a sign “with his name on it.”

        “I'm actually glad to see that the protesters are coming through this neighborhood, because it will draw attention to how Republicans at the convention are working hard to rebuild inner-city communities,” Mr. Gingrich said.

March slows traffic
        Thousands of homeless activists caused traffic headaches but few other problems Monday as a third day of Republican National Convention-related protests remained peaceful with only 11 arrests.

        While police threatened to arrest demonstrators who walked in the streets, officials acquiesced almost immediately when the group — led by about 80 children and some 20 people in wheelchairs — started marching in the roadway. The impromptu parade extended 4 miles from City Hall to within a block of the convention site, ending in a city park. There were no arrests.

        “We know that some people inside the convention would have loved for us to have a confrontation and get thrown in jail, but we weren't going to let that happen today,” protest organizer Cheri Honkala said.

        The officers were similarly restrained as they detoured traffic.

        Police said there have been a total of 17 convention-related arrests, including six people arrested over the weekend who were not identified by police as activists until Monday night.

Honoring Hoffa
        Republicans on Monday saluted a union boss at their convention for the first time in two decades — hoping to nurture their friendship with Teamsters chief James Hoffa and thwart an endorsement of Al Gore this fall.

        “I didn't know I had so many Republican friends,” Mr. Hoffa declared to hoots and hollers.

        The Republican Party surrounded the union bossand lavished him with praise and a reception usually reserved for big donors.

        “We're reaching out to a leading representative of the working families,” GOP Chairman Jim Nicholson said.

        “I feel at home,” Mr. Hoffa said.

Barbie's in the bag
        Barbie's gone bipartisan.

        The American icon of blond hair, big eyes and big dreams is here wearing a tailored red business suit and a can-do smile. And she's in the “goodie bags” of the GOP delegates and alternates.

        “Whenever we can take advantage of a cultural event such as the presidential campaign, we like to put Barbie in that role,” said Julia Jensen, a Barbie spokeswoman for Mattel. “It reminds people that Barbie, like girls, can do anything.”

        And not to worry. Barbie will be at the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles, too.

        “Delegate Barbie” — as Mattel is calling her — was designed to embrace multicultural themes espoused by both Republicans and Democrats.

        And Delegate Barbie is available as an African-American, Latino, Caucasian or Asian.

Back to Enquirer.com/gop



GOP stresses inclusion
Bush riding high through Ohio
Taft: It's up to Ohio to deliver
Chao makes Kentucky proud
Tonight's convention schedule
Prime time coverage
PULFER: No time for star gazing
WILKINSON: Power plays go on over breakfast
CROWLEY: Republicans unite for cause
Whitman: Abortion plank meaningless
McConnell rallies troops: Keep the Senate
Unity push gets platform passed
GOP presses PACs to donate 75 percent
Notebook: Convention tightens up security
Protesters, police keep problems to a minimum
Roll call gets rolling
- Scenes from Philly