The Cincinnati Enquirer
Sunday, May 28, 2000 -- Volume 5, No. 149
L O C A L
S P O R T S
B U S I N E S S
W E A T H E R
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Today's Local News
CITIZEN SOLDIERS
The most familiar image of the Vietnam veteran is the dysfunctional one. But the overwhelming majority are productive members of society.
Six veterans' stories:
George Schaefer, CEO, Fifth Third Bank
Richard Spoor, city attorney, Park Hills, Ky.
Howard Ferdon, tow truck driver
John Agenbroad, mayor of Springboro
Ronald Thompson, U.S. Army, retired
Barbara Rounds-Kugler, nurse
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TALK BACK CINCINNATI
Cincinnati.Com is proud to offer our readers interactive forums for free and open communication. We hope you enjoy this service.
Special
MEMORIAL DAY OBSERVANCES
Here's a list of parades and activities throughout the Tristate.
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RESULTS OF OUR E-MAIL POLL
Do you think gasoline prices will continue to rise this summer?

Headlines
For past stories, please see BackIssues or use our Search Engine.
National headlines from the AP, updated around the clock.

Local Headlines for  Sunday, May 28, 2000

General Assembly was busy
        COLUMBUS — As the curtain drops in Columbus, the 123rd General Assembly is leaving behind a list of new laws that affect everything from the taxes people pay to the electricity powering their homes.

Theory wins $40,000 prize
        Jason Douglas always wanted to go to an Ivy League university. This fall, he'll attend Hardvard with the help of a $40,000 science scholarship.

Graduates mourn classmate
        Less than 24 hours after he drowned on a senior canoe trip in Warren County, Tony Hoffman's chair was empty Saturday when his classmates graduated from Clinton Massie High School without him.

PULFER: Mapplethorpe
        Men in tight, black pants and garish ruffled shirts flaunting dangerously pointed footwear. Women in layers of hot pink fabric teetering on stiletto heels. Grandma painted them in oil. Over and over again.

WILKINSON: Rogue candidate takes GOP loyalty to the brink
        Now, not all Republicans are control freaks. No, not all.

Scene two: Selling the movie
        A year ago, filmmaker Edward Radtke had to remind himself not to get too elated. By mid-winter he had learned this: Filmmaking is pure aesthetics. Film acquisition is pure capitalism.
   Post-production problems
   A look at local films in works
   Prize-winning 'Dream Catcher' will open in Paris

Brian Rose digs up the past
        Here's an unlikely soul to be fighting crime in Turkey. Brian Rose, all 140 pounds of him, is a scholar, teacher and archaeologist whose 12 years digging up ancient Troy have put him on the world stage.

DEMALINE: Regional plan relies on county
       It's the end of May and you know what that means: summer reruns. What better time to re-visit favorite arts topics from last season that may have gotten lost in the daily mix of too much information and too little time?

Get to it

KENDRICK: A tough soldier battles a new enemy
        Listening to Joseph Dee talk about his life is like watching a dozen action films or reading a pile of best-selling thrillers without pausing for breath.

KIESEWETTER: Television news
        We seldom think how radical this concept was 20 years ago when Ted Turner launched his $20 million gamble, the Cable News Network, on June 1, 1980.

Museum's hog pops with art
        The 29th in the series spotlighting a pig from the Big Pig Gig Public Art Project taking place in Cincinnati, Covington and Newport.

Review: Carmina Burana
        With James Conlon on the podium, small wonder that this was the most dramatic performance of Orff's popular work in recent memory.

REVIEW: Coriolanus
        It's also a reminder of how far the festival has come in two years.

Veterans: We must remember them - and embrace them
        The Vietnam veteran I joined for lunch had a question, also. He wanted to know “how our country could act "cold' toward its veterans?”

BRONSON: WWII Heroes
        Walter Oka was 13 when he watched the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.

DAUGHERTY: Looking for cheese? Skip the fridge, try a teen's bedroom
        A teen's room: Adidas bag. School books, underwear, playing cards. Jogging pants, Dixie cup, Rolling Stone, CD case. And cheese.

A.M. REPORT

Complaints spark investigation of cemetery
        Cincinnati Police raided a Northside cemetery Friday, searching for records they think will show illegal business practices.

CROWLEY: Covington mayor's race topped surprises in this year's primary

That was the Covington mayor's race, particularly Bernie Moorman's stunning rise to first and Jim Eggemeier's spectacular plummet to third place, putting him out of the November election.

Diversion program faces challenge
        COVINGTON — Kenton Circuit Court's new diversion program, which allows some first-time felony offenders to escape a criminal record, is facing some legal challenges.

Dose of rain whets some appetites
        It seems Taste of Cincinnati is a dish best served cool, but definitely not wet.

Exhibit by deaf artists to open
        Brenda Schertz is animated when she explains, through sign language and facial expressions, the many facets of the work of deaf artists on display at the World Peace Bell Exhibit Center.

Lebanon road plan assailed
        LEBANON — Residents of Main Street are losing patience with the city over plans — in the works 30 years — to reconstruct their road.

Murder mystery: River uncovers skeleton
        FORT THOMAS — Henry Scharf left New York for Cincinnati 34 years ago, just days ahead of a federal indictment. He was never seen again by family and friends in his hometown of Weston, Conn.

SAMPLES: Good deeds
        Mr. Meade, 35, churns out good deeds the way Stephen King does novels. His neighborliness is prolific and instinctive — so much so that one of his fans called to brag on him.

Shakers gone but not forgotten
        CROSBY TOWNSHIP — Jim Innis can look across Oxford Road and into the open fields beyond and imagine what had been there — residences for boys and girls, a good-size milk barn nearby.

Queen City's moments to shine reflected in book
        There's a new book about a city that is hard not to love. It's a city of romantic sites and daring deeds, of caring people and good times, a place that treasures small-town values as it pursues big-city dreams.

S P E C I A L   F E A T U R E S
Outdoor concert guide
Check our schedule of summer music events at more than 10 Tristate venues.
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Three cheers for Fountain
The Genius of Water was unveiled May 6 at a rededication celebration that mingled citizen protest and spurts of rain with fun and enthusiasm for the refurbishing of Cincinnati's landmark.
Special section at Cincinnati.com

Son of Beast 'awesome'
“I waited five hours to get on this thing and it was worth every minute,” said Mike Heller, 15, of Mason. “This is the most awesome ride at Kings Island.”
Take a tour of 'Son of Beast'
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Summer Camp Guide
The Enquirer Summer Camp Guide provides information about hundreds of camps sponsored by Tristate schools, businesses, individuals and non-profit organizations.

Our city in pictures
A new book from The Enquirer features 121 photos of people, places and events that have shaped Greater Cincinnati this century. Each photo's story is told by award-winning columnist Cliff Radel.
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School confronts cancer
In a compelling three-part series, reporter John Johnston tells how students and staff at Finneytown High School face death and find strength in each other.

Make your plans for 2000
Check our FREETIME section for a calendar of the year's best entertainment events in the Tristate. Also, get movie, dining and music reviews.
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Focal Point
We're proud to showcase the work of Enquirer photographers at enquirer.com/focalpoint Click through 60 images from the past year.
TECHNOLOGY TODAY
SATURDAY'S LOCAL STORIES
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