Tuesday, April 18, 2000

Carnegie Center makes 2nd debut


'Spectacular Saturdays' planned

BY Allen Howard
The Cincinnati Enquirer

        The old Carnegie Library building, designed by renowned Cincinnati architect Samuel Hannaford, has been renovated and turned into a multipurpose center at 3738 Eastern Ave. in the East End.

        The Carnegie Center will officially open to the public at 10 a.m. May 6, with a variety of performances.

        “Each Saturday in May, we will have a series of performances, titled "Spectacular Saturdays,' designed to provide special incentive to parents and children,” said Brenda Moress, board member.

        The first performance will be Tom Sparough's comedy juggling show. Mr. Sparough is a local juggler who transforms his skills into hilarious skits.

        On May 13, the Badcap Giant Puppet Theater will be presented, featuring three stories: The Three Little Pigs, Three Billy Goats Gruff and Goldilocks and the Three Bears.

        On May 20, the Scottish pirate Thomas MacGregor will be presented by Thomas Scheidt of Centerville, Ohio.

        The last show, on May 27, will feature the former president of the Madisonville Community Council, Linda Roberts, one of 75 professional women magicians in the world.

        Ms. Roberts has agreed to teach a course in magic at the center.

        Through a grant from the Community Arts Fund, donations from the Robert H. Reakirt Foundation, the Columbia Tusculum Community Council, residents and friends, the century-old building has been returned to much of its original splendor with some added attractions.

        It has a 22-foot ceiling with sparkling cornice lights, and brass and globe chandeliers.

        It is located in the Columbia Tusculum Historic District.

        “Most of the fund raising and planning was done by volunteers,” said Mrs. Moress.

        She said the center will be run by volunteers from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays.

        “We hope to add Tuesdays and Thursdays in the near future,” Mrs. Moress said.

        The center will be available for group meetings and conferences, and it will be the headquarters of the Columbia Tusculum Community Council. Private lessons will be given in ballet.

        The center will operate a private library, which will be open to the public, said John Van Volkenburgh, a member of the planning committee. “This was a community effort and adds to rebuilding the Columbia Tusculum neighborhood.”

        The library is free, but is not connected to the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. People may browse and read. Mrs. Moress said a person must register to check out books.

        “Library cards from the public library may not be used,” she said.

        She said books have been donated by friends in Columbia Tusculum and Greater Cincinnati.

       



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