Saturday, September 04, 1999

Rose's bookie heads back to court


Peters faces harassing calls charges

BY SHEILA McLAUGHLIN
The Cincinnati Enquirer

        FRANKLIN — Smiling, and joking about needing a lawyer these days, Pete Rose's former bookie stood before a judge Friday for the second time this week.

        Three days after being jailed on charges that he assaulted a police officer in Springboro, Ron Peters appeared in Franklin Municipal Court on charges that he made harassing phone calls to his ex-wife's husband.

        The case stems from an ongoing spat that has sent Mr. Peters to the courthouse here and in Mason numerous times since 1997 on charges that he stalked or threatened Ryan McCurley of Franklin.

        “I called and asked for my daughter. I'm the ex-husband,” Mr. Peters told Judge David Ruppert about the most recent incident in August. He pleaded not guilty to a charge of telephone harassment.

        Mr. Peters, who was released in April from an Ohio prison where he served time for stealing a car, faces more serious trouble in Springboro.

        In addition to the felony assault, he is charged with resisting arrest, fleeing and eluding, driving under suspension, falsification and failing to drive in marked lanes.

        Those charges involve an incident around midnight Monday when Mr. Peters was pulled over for driving erratically at Lytle Five Points and Crossley roads.

        According to police, Mr. Peters became disorderly when Officer Kelly Denlinger ordered him out of the car for field sobriety tests. The two scuffled and Mr. Peters ran off after elbowing Officer Denlinger in the face and knocking him to the ground.

        A sheriff's deputy arrested Mr. Peters five hours later after finding him walking up a road in the Springboro area.

        Held at the Warren County Justice Center on a $50,000 bond, Mr. Peters is scheduled to appear in Warren County Court Tuesday for a preliminary hearing to determine whether the case should be sent to a grand jury.

        His lawyer, Bill Knapp, said Friday he also will ask the judge at that time to reduce Mr. Peters' bond.

        Meanwhile, Mr. Peters is scheduled for trial Sept. 29 in Franklin on an aggravated menacing charge filed in April involving alleged threats to Mr. McCurley. At the time, Mr. McCurley was coaching Mr. Peters' daughter's softball team at Millard Field in Franklin.

        That accusation violated Mr. Peters probation in Mason, where he was accused of stalking Mr. McCurley.

        Because Mr. Peters failed to show up for a May hearing on the probation matter, Mason authorities now want him back in their court and have issued warrants for his arrest.

        A couple weeks ago, Mr. Peters told The Cincinnati Enquirer that his own life was finally “back on track” after being turned upside down by baseball's betting investigation.

       



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